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Mazo de la Roche (January 15, 1879 – July 12, 1961)

Mazo de la Roche, born Mazo Louise Roche in Newmarket, Ontario, Canada, was the author of the Jalna novels, one of the most popular series of books of her time.
Born: January 15, 1879, Newmarket, Canada
Died: July 12, 1961, Toronto, Canada
Movies: Jalna
Parents: Alberta Roche, William Roche
People also search for: Heather Kirk, D. Petsch, Eva Zahn, more
Lived: The Sovereign House, 7 W River St, Oakville, ON L6L 3B3, Canada (43.39024, -79.71089)
3 Ava Crescent, Toronto, ON M5P 3B2, Canada (43.69815, -79.41852)
Zoroastrian Society Of Ontario, 3590 Bayview Ave, Toronto, ON M2M, Canada (43.80204, -79.39632)
307 Russell Hill Road, Toronto (43.6887, -79.40882)
Buried: St. George's Anglican Church & Cemetery, Sutton, York Regional Municipality, Ontario, Canada
Buried alongside: Caroline Clement

Mazo de la Roche was the author of the Jalna novels, one of the most popular series of books of her time. At the age of seven, Mazo de la Roche's parents adopted her orphaned younger cousin Caroline Clement, who joined in her fantasy world game and would become her lifelong companion. De la Roche herself had said in her autobiography, Ringing the Changes, that she and Clement were “raised together as sisters.” The two lived a reclusive life; their relationship was not widely discussed in the press. In 1931, they adopted two children whose parents were friends of Clement and de la Roche and who had died. “Their relationship would have been symbiotic. De la Roche found in Clement not only subject matter but also reason to live.” –Heather Kirk. “Caroline Clement was almost Mazo’s other self. These two dissimilar but perfectly attuned persons lived one of the most unusual and certainly most productive partnerships in the history of literature” –Ronald Hambleton. De la Roche and Clement are buried one near each other in the St. George’s churchyard at Sibbald Point Provincial Park near Sutton West, Ontario
Together from 1886 to 1961: 75 years.
Caroline Clement (April 4, 1878 – 1972?)
Mazo de la Roche (January 15, 1879 – July 12, 1961)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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The Bronte Historical Society is a volunteer run non-profit charitable organization dedicated to preserving Bronte’s heritage and celebrating its past.
Address: The Sovereign House, 7 W River St, Oakville, ON L6L 3B3, Canada (43.39024, -79.71089)
Type: Guest Facility (open to public)
Phone: +1 905-825-5552
Place
Built in 1815
Philip Sovereign came to the Twelve (later named Bronte) from the New York area in 1814. Upon arrival, Philip purchased a plot of land from the Mississauga Natives along the western bank of the Twelve. Philip had the first log school house built on his property where his son, Charles Sovereign, would teach at the age of 17. As early settlers in the area, The Sovereigns, along with other notable families like the Belyeas, became directly involved with the shaping of Bronte as a town. Philip’s son Charles would continue to be a leader in the community by becoming Justice of the Peace. As a prominent and visible member of the community, Charles was suited to be part of the Bronte Harbour Company as the company’s secretary. Novelist, Mazo de la Roche and her family rented the Sovereign House for five years. Many of her novels and short stories were directly inspired by Bronte and its citizens as well as the surrounding area. In particular, Mazo’s novel “Possession” contains many characters and events that were drawn from her actual encounters in Bronte.
Life
Who: Mazo Louise Roche (January 15, 1879 – July 12, 1961) aka Mazo de la Roche
Mazo de la Roche was the author of the Jalna novels, one of the most popular series of books of her time. When she was seven, her parents adopted her orphaned younger cousin Caroline Clement, who joined in her fantasy world game and would become her lifelong companion. The two lived a fairly reclusive life; their relationship was not discussed widely in the press. In 1931 they adopted the two orphaned children of friends of theirs. Before she became famous, she lived for five years in Sovereign House in Bronte which has been designated a historical building by the Bronte Historical Society. Mazo’s "Whiteoaks Chronicles" figures into the term "Whiteoaks" which usually refers to the Oakville-Bronte area. Mazo de la Roche is buried near the grave of Stephen Leacock at St. George’s Anglican Church, at Sibbald Point, near Sutton, Ontario.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
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Mazo de la Roche’s house at 3590 Bayview Avenue in Toronto, Ontario, bought by The Zoroastrian Society of Ontario in 1975, serves as its community centre. It is listed as a City of Toronto Heritage Property.
Addresses:
3 Ava Crescent, Toronto, ON M5P 3B2, Canada (43.69815, -79.41852)
Zoroastrian Society Of Ontario, 3590 Bayview Ave, Toronto, ON M2M, Canada (43.80204, -79.39632)
307 Russell Hill Road, Toronto (43.6887, -79.40882)
Place
From the beginnings in the mid-sixties when the Parsi Zoroastrians first immigrated to Canada from India, to today the Zoroastrian Society of Ontario (ZSO) is the largest association of Zoroastrians outside of India and Iran. As the numbers began to grow, the ZSO was founded in 1971 and registered as a not for profit religious organization. The Zarathushtis are survivors of what is an almost 4,000 year old religion, practising the religion of Asho Zarathushtra in this multicultural environment.
Life
Who: Mazo Louise Roche (January 15, 1879 – July 12, 1961) aka Mazo de la Roche
From 1939 to 1945, Mazo de la Roche and her family lived successively in three houses in the Toronto area. The first was in the village of Thornhill, just north of Toronto. The second, called “Windrush Hill,” was located at the junction of Bayview Avenue and Steeles Avenue in York Mills (now the Zoroastrian Society Of Ontario), now part of Toronto. The third was on 307 Russell Hill Road (built in 1907), right in Toronto. In 1946, the British government expropriated Vale House, Mazo’s home in England, and Mazo and Caroline Clement sold Trail Cottage. In 1953 the family moved into 3 Ava Crescent (completed in 1930) in the posh Forest Hill district of Toronto. There Mazo and Caroline stayed until their deaths. This last home in Forest Hill was as English at it could be. Large and rambling, with Tudor-style timbers, a panelled entrance, snug library, terrace, and deep fireplace, it had badly heated, undecorated servants’ quarters on the top floor. Mazo de la Roche died quietly in the early morning of July 12, 1961, at her home in Toronto, in bed in the presence of her family. After Mazo passed away, Caroline immediately went into her own room and closed the door. She burned Mazo’s diaries. Caroline overrode Mazo’s will, which said she should be buried in Toronto. Caroline directed that Mazo be buried in St. George’s churchyard (408 Hedge Rd, Sutton, ON) beside Sibbald Point Provincial Park on the south shore of Lake Simcoe. For eleven years Caroline lived on alone in the house on Ava Crescent in Toronto. She is buried next to Mazo de la Roche.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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Tags: days of love, queer places
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