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John Seely, Lord Mottistone (May 1, 1899 – January 18, 1963)

Lived: Mottistone Manor, Longstone Farmhouse, Strawberry Lane, Mottistone, Newport, Isle of Wight PO30 4ED, UK (50.65174, -1.42821)
Buried: Little Cloisters, Westminster Abbey, Westminster, City of Westminster, Greater London, England (memorial)

Mottistone Manor is a National Trust property in the village of Mottistone on the Isle of Wight. It has popular gardens and is a listed building. It was first mentioned in documents related to the Domesday Book.
Address: Longstone Farmhouse, Strawberry Lane, Mottistone, Newport, Isle of Wight PO30 4ED, UK (50.65174, -1.42821)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Phone: +44 1983 741020
Place
The oldest parts of the manor, the south-east wing, date from the XV or early XVI century. The north-west wing was added or remodelled by Thomas Cheke in 1567, and additions to the south-east wing were made in the early XVII century. The whole house was remodelled in the 1920s by the architects Seely and Paget, Henry John Alexander Seely, 2nd Baron Mottistone (1899–1963) of the firm being a great-grandson of Charles Seely (1803–1887), who had bought the house and estate in 1861. Though not open to the public, the manor has hosted gatherings for the Seely family. The great-great granddaughter of General J. E. B. Seely, 1st Baron Mottistone, the theatre and opera director Sophie Hunter, held her wedding reception here with Benedict Cumberbatch on February 14, 2015.
Life
Who: Henry John Alexander Seely, 2nd Baron Mottistone (1899–1963)
'The Shack' is a small caravan in the grounds of Mottistone Manor in which the Hon. John Seeley and Paul Paget spent weekends. Seeley later inherited the title Lord Mottistone. The pair were founders of an architectural practice that flourished from the 1920s to the 1960s as Seeley & Paget. The firm is best known for their church architecture and the business partners were also life partners. Entertaining lavishly at Mottistone Manor the pair retreated at night to The Shack where they slept in bunks at either end of their tiny space - while guests relaxed in the more comfortable rooms of the Manor. This sleeping arrangement enabled them to avoid accusations of a sexual relationship when necessary. The interior of the The Shack was designed by the architects in chrome and plywood in the Modern movement style - while the outside is more rustic. Though small inside, there were luxuries such as heated chromed steel pipes formed into a ladder up to the bunk beds so they went to bed with warm feet. The Manor is in private ownership but the National Trust now admits visitors to The Shack as part of visits to the Mottistone estate and gardens. John Seely and Paul Paget also designed Eltham Palace, which hosted “The Queens of Eltham Palace” event for LGBT History Month 2012.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

There are three original gardens within Westminster Abbey: the Garth, the Little Cloister and College Garden. St Catherine's Garden lies in the area of the ruined monastery and was more recently created. Each Garden had a separate function: the Garth with its square of turf, bounded by Cloisters, gave the monks somewhere to rest their eyes and minds as they walked around it. Metaphysically speaking, green was symbolic of rebirth, and therefore appropriate for spiritual refreshment.
Address: Westminster, London SW1P 3PJ, UK (51.49828, -0.12756)
Type: Religious Building (open to public)
Place
The Little Cloister Garden with its fountain and borders of scented plants was an area set aside for recuperation after illness. There would have probably been seats in this garden, and may have well been turf-topped ones, which were common in medieval times. The College Garden was the Infirmarer's Garden, used for the purposes of growing medicinal herbs and foods for the general well-being of the occupants of the Abbey. It is very unusual (possibly unique in England) for an Abbey or Monastery to still have its infirmarer's garden attached and kept as a garden. The Infirmary Garden originally contained an orchard (hence the name of the nearby Abbey Orchard Street). Though the orchard would have grown apples, pears, plums, figs, mulberries, nuts, medlars and vines, it did not exist merely to provide food. It was also an area of beauty, neatly laid out with plentiful paths and containing roses and lilies. This area was also known as the Cemetery Orchard for the monks were buried there. Symbolically, life and death were dovetailed in this garden. Vegetables such as broad beans, leeks, onions, garlic, coleworts (kale) and root vegetables were grown in a separate plot. There were also fishponds, beehives, and an area for growing medicinal herbs. The value of herbs to medieval people cannot be overestimated. Their bland vegetable and starch diet needed herbal flavouring to make it palatable. Herbs had enormous symbolic meaning, many being named after the Virgin Mary such as 'Lady's Bedstraw', Galium verum. Illnesses were treated by diet, blood-letting, and the application of herbs - surgery was only attempted in cases of direst need. The Gardens were tended by a Head Gardener and two undergardeners. They were monks and expected to attend matins and compline, though they were asked to leave their muddy boots and capes outside. In addition to providing the Abbey with food, the Gardener also gave away fruit from the orchard to local people on 25th July every year, St James' Day. Up to 1300, England had a Mediterranean climate, ideal for fruit growing, and especially vines and wine making. After this the weather became cool and damp. The Gardener had one day off a year, called his 'O' Day. He could choose when he wanted to take it, and the other monks gave money for him to spend on his special day. College Garden has been in cultivation for over 900 years. The oldest surviving feature that can be seen today is the stone precinct wall, built in 1376, at the far end and on the east side. The XVIII century Westminster School dormitory on the west side was designed by the Earl of Burlington. Four rather decayed statues of saints in the garden came originally from an altarpiece of 1686 and were carved by Arnold Quellin. The tall plane trees were planted in 1850. In 1993 a bronze sculpture of the Crucifixion by Enzo Plazzotta was presented and is at the south end of the garden. Nearby is a single water jet fountain installed in 2002.
Life
Who: Henry John Alexander Seely, 2nd Lord Mottistone (May 1, 1899 – January 18, 1963) and Paul Edward Paget (January 24, 1901 – August 13, 1985)
John Seely, of the architect firm of Seely & Paget, re-built several of the houses in Little Cloister, Westminster Abbey, after war damage. They also re-built the Deanery which had been blitzed in 1941. In a niche in the wall of one of these clergy houses overlooking St Catherine's chapel garden is a fibreglass statue of St Catherine by Edwin Russell which forms a memorial to Lord Mottistone. The Latin on the plaque below, which is flanked by two seahorses, can be translated: "John Mottistone. This is a sign of love and sadness. P.E.P. 1966 A.C.D." The initials are those of his partner Paul Edward Paget and the Dean of Westminster at that time, Alan Campbell Don. The statue was unveiled on 25 November 1966. He was a son of John Seely, 1st Baron Mottistone, politician, and his wife Emily. After education at Harrow School and Cambridge he served in WWI. A brother was killed at Arras in 1917. During WWII he served in the Auxiliary Air Force and at the Ministry of Works. In 1947 he succeeded to his father's title. He was Surveyor to the Fabric at St Paul's Cathedral, architect to St George's chapel, Windsor Castle and a Lay Canon and architect at Portsmouth cathedral. Among the other buildings Seely & Paget restored after war damage were Lambeth Palace, Eton College and many London churches. He died on January 18, 1963 and was succeeded in the title by his brother Arthur. The statue is in a private garden but can be seen through the door of St Catherine's chapel when the Little Cloister is open to the public Tuesdays-Thursdays. The gardens of his residence on the Isle of Wight, in Mottistone village, are open to the public.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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