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Lytton Strachey (March 1, 1880 – January 21, 1932)

Giles Lytton Strachey was a British writer and critic. A founding member of the Bloomsbury Group and author of Eminent Victorians, he is best known for establishing a new form of biography in which ...
Born: March 1, 1880, London, United Kingdom
Died: January 21, 1932, Hungerford, United Kingdom
Education: University of Cambridge
Lived: The Mill, Tidmarsh, Reading, West Berkshire RG8, UK (51.46833, -1.08754)
Ham Spray House, Marlborough, Wiltshire SN8 3QZ, UK (51.3681, -1.50219)
51 Gordon Square, Bloomsbury, WC1H
Sutton Court, A368, Stowey-Sutton, Bath and North East Somerset BS39 5TX, UK (51.34174, -2.58037)
Stowey House, Clapham Common, Windmill Dr, London SW4 9DE, UK (51.45783, -0.14816)
67 Belsize Park Gardens, London NW3, UK (51.54694, -0.16578)
6 Belsize Park Gardens, London NW3, UK (51.54831, -0.16922)
69 Lancaster Gate, London W2 3NA, UK (51.51124, -0.1823)
Buried: Church of St Andrew, South Parade, at the bottom of the High Street, Chew Magna, Avon, BS408SH
Parents: Richard Strachey
Siblings: James Strachey, Julia Strachey, Dorothy Bussy, Oliver Strachey

Giles Lytton Strachey was a British writer and critic. Dora Carrington was a British painter and decorative artist, remembered in part for her association with members of the Bloomsbury Group, especially Lytton Strachey. Though Strachey spoke openly about his homosexuality with his Bloomsbury friends (he had a relationship with John Maynard Keynes, who also was part of the Bloomsbury group), it was not widely publicized until the late 1960s, in a biography by Michael Holroyd. In 1921, Carrington agreed to marry Ralph Partridge, not for love but to secure the 3-way relationship. Strachey himself had been much more sexually interested in Partridge, as well as in various other young men, including a secret sadomasochistic relationship with Roger Senhouse (later the head of publisher Secker & Warburg). Dora Carrington committed suicide out of grief in 1932, shortly after Lytton Strachey’s death. Ralph married Frances Marshall on March 2, 1933. They lived happily at Ham Spray until Ralph’s death in 1960.
Together from 1917 to 1932: 15 years.
Dora de Houghton Carrington (March 29, 1893 – March 11, 1932)
Giles Lytton Strachey (March 1, 1880 –January 21, 1932)
Ralph Partridge (1894 – November 30, 1960)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
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Stowey House was a Victorian mansion off the south side of Clapham Common.
Address: Clapham Common, Windmill Dr, London SW4 9DE, UK (51.45783, -0.14816)
Type: Public Park (open to public)
Phone: +44 20 7926 9000
Place
Lytton Strachey was born on March 1, 1880 at Stowey House, Clapham Common, London, the fifth son and the eleventh child of Lieutenant General Sir Richard Strachey, an officer in the British colonial armed forces, and his second wife, the former Jane Grant, who became a leading supporter of the women’s suffrage movement. In 1920, as part of a second wave of establishing open air schools in the capital, the LCC set up an open air school in the grounds of Stowey House. The Stowey House Open Air School accommodated some 300 “delicate” and pre-tuberculous children, selected from five times that number nominated by school medical officers. Entered by a small door through a wall off the busy street, the School had 8 classroom pavilions (5 for boys and 3 for girls), plus a larger structure used for the pupils’ daily rest, and for folk dancing and corrective exercise. Parts of the school facilities and furniture had been built by the children themselves. They also worked in the gardens. Pupils remained at the School for about 12 to 18 months. The School survived the disruptions of WW2, and carried on at least through the 1950s and closed in the mid 1960s. Stowey House was demolished in 1967. In the late 1960s its site, and the adjacent South Lodge, were redeveloped as new premises for the Henry Thornton School. These, in their turn, have been superseded by the buildings of Lambeth College. The site of the Open Air School is now occupied by the southern part of the College and its grounds.
Life
Who: Giles Lytton Strachey (March 1, 1880 – January 21, 1932)
Lytton Strachey was a British writer and critic. A founding member of the Bloomsbury Group and author of “Eminent Victorians,” he is best known for establishing a new form of biography in which psychological insight and sympathy are combined with irreverence and wit. His biography “Queen Victoria” (1921) was awarded the James Tait Black Memorial Prize. At Trinity College, Cambridge, Strachey soon became closely associated: Clive Bell, Leonard Woolf and Saxon Sydney-Turner. With another undergraduate student, A. J. Robertson, these students formed a group called the Midnight Society, which, in the opinion of Clive Bell, was the source of the Bloomsbury Group. Other close friends at Cambridge were Thoby Stephen and his sisters Vanessa and Virginia Stephen (later Bell and Woolf respectively.) Strachey also became acquainted with other men who greatly influenced him, including G. Lowes Dickinson, John Maynard Keynes, Walter Lamb (brother of the painter Henry Lamb), George Mallory, Bertrand Russell and G. E. Moore. Strachey had an unusual relationship with the painter Dora Carrington. She loved him and they lived together from 1917 until his death. In 1921 Carrington agreed to marry Ralph Partridge, not for love but to secure a three-way relationship. She committed suicide two months after Strachey’s death.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Lancaster Gate is a mid-XIX century development in the Bayswater district of central London, immediately to the north of Kensington Gardens. Lytton Strachey lived here with his family in childhood and beyond.
Address: 69 Lancaster Gate, London W2 3NA, UK (51.51124, -0.1823)
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
Place
When Lytton Strachey was four years old the family moved from Stowey House to 69 Lancaster Gate, North of Kensington Gardens. Lancaster Gate consists of two long terraces of houses overlooking the park, with a wide gap between them opening onto a square containing a church. Further terraces back onto the pair overlooking the park and loop around the square. Until 1865 the terraces were known as Upper Hyde Park Gardens, with the name Lancaster Gate limited to the square surrounding the church. The development takes its name from Lancaster Gate, a nearby entrance to Kensington Gardens, itself named in honour of Queen Victoria as Duke of Lancaster. The terraces are stuccoed and are in an eclectic classical style featuring English Baroque details and French touches. The church, known as Christ Church, Lancaster Gate, was an asymmetrical gothic composition with a needle spire. The architects were F. & H. Francis. The Church was one of the most well known in London, but when dry rot was discovered in the roof the decision was taken to demolish most of the site and redevelop it. The last service in the church was on March 6, 1977, and demolition began on August 15, 1977; only the tower and spire survive. The rest of the building was replaced by a housing scheme called Spire House in 1983. Lancaster Gate stands alongside Hyde Park Gardens as one of the two grandest of the XIX century housing schemes lining the northern side of Hyde Park and Kensington Gardens. The development was planned in 1856-57 on the site of a nursery and tea gardens, and construction took at least 10 years. The terraces overlooking the park were designed by Sancton Wood and those around the square by John Johnson. The exteriors are largely complete, with just a couple of XX century infills, but many of the interiors have been reconstructed behind the facades. Many of the properties are still in residential use and command very high prices. Others are used as embassies (such as the Embassy of Costa Rica), offices, or hotels. For many years, the headquarters of The Football Association were located in Lancaster Gate and the term was often used as a metonym for the organisation, but it later relocated to Soho Square and is now based at Wembley Stadium.
Life
Who: Giles Lytton Strachey (March 1, 1880 – January 21, 1932)
69 Lancaster Gate was Lytton Strachey home until Sir Richard Strachey retired. After Strachey left Cambridge in 1905 his mother assigned him a bed-sitting room here. During his boyhood, while his parents were in India, Duncan Grant spent much time here with the family of Sir Richard and Lady Strachey. Currently 66-71 Lancaster Gate is the Lancaster Gate Hotel.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Lytton Strachey, biographer and prominent member of the Bloomsbury Group, lived here from 1907 to 1914, where he wrote “Eminent Victorians.
Addresses:
67 Belsize Park Gardens, London NW3, UK (51.54694, -0.16578)
6 Belsize Park Gardens, London NW3, UK (51.54831, -0.16922)
Place
In 1907, lady Strachey, Lytton’s mother, decided that they should move later that year to a dilapidated house in Belsize Park Gardens, Hampstead. “There is a basement billiard-room,” Lytton wrote to Duncan Grant after inspecting the new house, “the darkest chamber I’ve ever seen in my life, and without billiard table. Your mother, mine and I found ourselves locked into it, and thought we’d be discovered three crumbling skeletons – forty years hence. Fortunately I was able to leap a wall and attract a caretaker.” No. 67 Belsize Park Gardens, NW3 was a smaller house than Lancaster Gate, but still spacious enough to cater for the rather depleted numbers of the family. As before in the previous house, Lytton was assigned a bed-sitting-room where he was to compose his reviews and articles. In January 1914 he stayed with his family, who where then making preliminary arrangements to move from no. 67 to no. 6 Belsize Park Gardens, NW3. “I flew from Square to Square, from Chelsea to Hampstead Heath with infinite alacrity,” he told Duncan Grant. The name Belsize is derived from French “bel assis” meaning “well situated.” The Manor of Belsize dates back to 1317. Although not named on the Geographers’ London Atlas, the area has many thoroughfares bearing its name: Belsize Avenue, Belsize Court, Belsize Crescent, Belsize Gardens, Belsize Grove, Belsize Lane, Belsize Mews, Belsize Park (the road), Belsize Park Gardens, Belsize Place, Belsize Square, and Belsize Terrace. The name comes from the XVII century manor house and parkland (built by Daniel O’Neill for his wife, the Countess of Chesterfield) which once stood on the site. The estate built up between 1852 and 1878, by which time it extended to Haverstock Hill. After WWI, the construction of blocks of flats began, and now a great many of the larger houses are also converted into flats. In WWII, a large underground air-raid shelter was built here and its entrance can still be seen near the tube station at Downside Crescent. The area on Haverstock Hill north of Belsize Park underground station up to Hampstead Town Hall and including part of a primary school near the Royal Free Hospital was heavily bombed. When the area was rebuilt, the opportunity was taken to widen the pavement and build further back from the road.
Life
Who: Giles Lytton Strachey (March 1, 1880 – January 21, 1932)
After the Strachey family moved to 67 Belsize Park Gardens in Hampstead, and later to another house in the same street (6 Belsize Park Gardens), Lytton Strachey was assigned other bed-sitters. But, as he was about to turn 30, family life started irritating him, and he took to travelling into the country more often, supporting himself by writing reviews and critical articles for The Spectator and other periodicals. In 1916 Lytton Strachey was back in London living with his mother at 6 Belsize Park Gardens, Hampstead, where she had now moved. In the late autumn of 1917, however, his brother Oliver and his friends Harry Norton, John Maynard Keynes and Saxon Sydney-Turner agreed to pay the rent on the Mill House at Tidmarsh, near Pangbourne, Berkshire, where they all moved.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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English Heritage Blue Plaque: 46 Gordon Square, John Maynard Keynes (1883–1946), "Economist lived here 1916–1946"
Addresses:
46 Gordon Square, Kings Cross, London WC1H 0PD, UK (51.52445, -0.13018)
51 Gordon Square, London WC1H, UK (51.52419, -0.12987)
52 Tavistock Square, Kings Cross, London WC1H, UK (51.5247, -0.12791)
Place
Gordon Square is in Bloomsbury, in the London Borough of Camden, London (postal district WC1) part of the Bedford Estate. Gordon Square was developed by master builder Thomas Cubitt in the 1820s, as one of a pair with Tavistock Square, which is a block away and has the same dimensions. As with most London squares the central garden was originally for the private use of the residents of the surrounding houses, but it now belongs to the University of London and is open to the public. The square is named after the second wife of the 6th Duke of Bedford, Lady Georgiana Gordon, daughter of Alexander Gordon, 4th Duke of Gordon. The university owns many of the buildings in the square and in early 2005 it submitted an application for a refurbishment of the square, including the reinstatement of railings similar to the originals. The work was completed in 2007. The west side of the square is dominated by the listed church of Christ the King and next to it the home of Dr Williams’s Library.
Notable queer resident at Gordon & Tavistock Square:
• James Strachey (September 26, 1887 - April 25, 1967), Lytton’s brother, lived at n. 41 Gordon Square, WC1H from 1919-56, with his wife, Alix, sometimes joined by Ralph Partridge.
• The economist John Maynard Keynes (1883–1946) lived at no. 46 Gordon Square, WC1H marked by a blue plaque. Before Keynes moved in, the same house was occupied by a young Virginia Woolf (1882-1941) and her siblings (including the noted painter and interior designer Vanessa Bell (1879-1961)) from 1905 to 1907 and frequented by other members of the Bloomsbury Group.
• Vanessa Bell moved into no. 50 Gordon Square, WC1H in 1920, moving to no. 37 Gordon Square, WC1H from 1922-29, with Clive Bell moving into no. 50.
• English Heritage Blue Plaque: 51 Gordon Square, Bloomsbury, WC1H Lytton Strachey (1880-1932), “Critic and biographer lived here.” Strachey moved here shortly after writing “Eminent Victorians” (1918), his controversial critique of Victorian values which set new parameters in the art of biography. In Gordon Square Strachey produced its follow-up, “Queen Victoria” (1921), another debunker of Victorian myths.
• From 1924 to 1939 Virginia Woolf lived at no. 52 Tavistock Square, WC1H south side of square: bombed in October, 1940 and replaced by the Tavistock Hotel in 1951.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Once home to the Bloomsbury group, The Mill at Tidmarsh in Berkshire is still an inspiring abode. The Mill was last on the market in 2010 for £1.995.000.
Address: Tidmarsh, Reading, West Berkshire RG8, UK (51.46833, -1.08754)
Type: Private Property
English Heritage Building ID: 400899 (Grade II, 1984)
Place
"Sounds too good to be alright!" wrote Dora Carrington to Lytton Strachey on the morning of October 19, 1917. She was poring over the particulars of The Mill at Tidmarsh in Berkshire. There was electric light and "bath H & C.” It was romantic and lovely, and the rent was £52 a year for a three-year lease. Carrington first set up house with Lytton Strachey in Nov. 1917, when they moved together to Tidmarsh Mill House, near Pangbourne, Berkshire. Carrington met Ralph Partridge, an Oxford friend of her younger brother Noel, in 1918. Strachey fell in love with Partridge and eventually, in 1921, Carrington agreed to marry him, not for love but to hold the menage a trois together with Lytton Strachey. Strachey paid for the wedding, and also accompanied the couple on their honeymoon in Venice.
Life
Who: Dora de Houghton Carrington (March 29, 1893 – March 11, 1932)
Dora Carrington moved into the mill with Lytton Strachey (1880-1932) just as he was publishing “Eminent Victorians,” the book that made him famous. The pair were already prominent in the Bloomsbury circle, which included Clive and Vanessa Bell (1879-1961), whose highly decorated house, Charleston in Sussex, is open to the public. Lytton and Carrington were frequently seen at Lady Ottoline Morrell (1873-1938)’s parties at Garsington Manor. He was a spidery, bearded intellectual, widely known to be homosexual, she a Slade-trained artist with a pageboy haircut and no first name. Their decision to live together raised eyebrows inside and outside their group.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Love and literary retreat, a Wiltshire farmhouse was a bliss for a Bloomsbury threesome. Ham Spray House was last on the market in 2008 for £2.750.000.
Address: Marlborough, Wiltshire SN8 3QZ, UK (51.3681, -1.50219)
Type: Private Property
Place
In 1924, Lytton Strachey and Ralph Partridge, members of the Bloomsbury group, bought Ham Spray House, and several of that group and other writers and artists spent time there from then until Ralph died in 1960, including Dora Carrington and Frances Partridge. Ham Spray, which cost Partridge and Strachey £2,300, suited their communal living and working arrangements. Surrounded by fields, and with a local shop selling Wellington boots, it was "a perfect English country house.” "We believed there was no view more beautiful, more inexhaustible in England, and no house more lovable than Ham Spray," wrote Frances in her diary. The rooms are of Georgian proportions, with high ceilings and cornices and pretty fireplaces. Carrington’s paintings hung on every wall, alongside works by Duncan Grant, Vanessa Bell and Augustus John. While Lytton Strachey wrote in his upstairs study, looking out across Ham Hill and Inkpen Beacon, Carrington painted in a studio above the former granary. In the evenings, they gathered in the music room, where there was a piano, gramophone and ping-pong table. In Strachey’s former study – now a bedroom - there are surviving works by Carrington, including a mural of an owl and a self-portrait of her riding across the Downs, painted on a tile. On a door in the corner of the room is a trompe d’oeil of a bookshelf, featuring titles such as “Deception” by Jane Austen and “The Empty Room” by Virginia Woolf.
Life
Who: Ralph Partridge (1894 – November 30, 1960)
Dora Carrington was in love with Lytton Strachey, who loved Ralph Partridge, an ex-army officer; Carrington loved Strachey, but married Partridge to stabilise their triangular relationship. In 1924, they set up home together at the XIX-century farmhouse outside the village of Ham, in Wiltshire, along with Ralph’s lover (and later wife) Frances Marshall (1900-2004.) Strachey died of stomach cancer at Ham Spray in January 1932. Carrington, who saw no purpose in a life without Strachey, committed suicide two months after his death by shooting herself with a gun borrowed from her friend, Hon. Bryan Guinness (later 2nd Baron Moyne.) Her body was cremated and the ashes buried under the laurels in the garden of Ham Spray House. Strachey's modest little brass plaque is in the family church at Chew Magna, Somerset. The Partridges had a son, Burgo, and continued to live at the house for almost 30 years, entertaining a roll-call of artists and writers, among them E.M. Forster and Patrick Leigh Fermor. Frances sold the house a year after Ralph’s death in 1961, insisting that it did not become a shrine to the Bloomsbury Group.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Lytton Strachey's modest little brass plaque is in the family chapel at the Church of St Andrew (South Parade, at the bottom of the High Street, Chew Magna, Avon, BS408SH).
Address: A368, Stowey-Sutton, Bath and North East Somerset BS39 5TX, UK (51.34174, -2.58037)
Type: Museum (open to public)
English Heritage Building ID: 32831 (Grade II, 1960)
Place
Sutton Court is an English house remodelled by Thomas Henry Wyatt in the 1850s from a manor house built in the XV and XVI centuries around a XIV-century fortified pele tower and surrounding buildings. The house is at Stowey in the Chew Valley in an area of Somerset now part of Bath and North East Somerset, near to the village of Bishop Sutton. The house is surrounded by an extensive estate, laid out as a Ferme ornée, part of which is now the Folly Farm nature reserve. Since the early modern period the house has been the country seat of several prominent families including the St Loes one of whom married Bess of Hardwick. They lived at Sutton Court and expanded the property in the second half of the XVI century. Throughout the XVIII and XIX centuries it was owned by the Strachey baronets and their descendants until it was sold in 1987 and converted into apartments. In the early 1980's the house was used as a film location for the BBC Look and Read series “Dark Towers,” a series very popular to this day in Primary schools.
Life
Who: Giles Lytton Strachey (March 1, 1880 – January 21, 1932)
The house became the seat of the Strachey family including John Strachey, the geologist, who inherited estates including Sutton Court from his father in 1674 at three years of age. He introduced a theory of rock formations known as Stratum, based on a pictorial cross-section of the geology under the estate and coal seams in nearby coal works of the Somerset Coalfield. He projected them according to their measured thicknesses and attitudes into unknown areas between the coal workings. The purpose was to enhance the value of his grant of a coal-lease on parts of his estate. This work was later developed by William Smith. Henry Strachey, the grandson of the geologist and a senior civil servant, was created a baronet in 1801. When he inherited the house in the XVIII century the house had been mortgaged, however the mortgage was paid by Strachey's employer Clive of India. Henry Strachey, the 2nd Baronet, was appointed High Sheriff of Somerset in 1832 and Edward Strachey the 3rd Baronet High Sheriff in 1864. In 1858 much of the house was remodelled for the 3rd Baronet by Thomas Henry Wyatt. The 4th Baronet who was also Edward Strachey, a Liberal politician, was returned to Parliament for Somerset South at the 1892 general election. He served under Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman and later H. H. Asquith as Treasurer of the Household from 1905 to 1909 and under Asquith as Parliamentary Secretary to the Board of Agriculture and Fisheries from 1909 to 1911. He was raised to the Peerage as Baron Strachie in 1911. During the 1970s major restoration work was undertaken to deal with dry rot and replace wiring which resulted in the removal of several ceilings and decorations from many of the rooms. Maurice Towneley-O'Hagan the 3rd Baron O'Hagan married Edward Strachey's daughter, the Hon. Frances Constance Maddalena and thereby gained Sutton Court. When he died it passed to his grandson, Tory MEP Charles Strachey, 4th Baron O'Hagan. He sold it in 1987 for conversion into flats. The building is now private apartments set in fifteen acres (3 ha) of communal grounds, including a trout lake and tennis court. It is run by a management company made up of the residents. Lytton Strachey was the fifth son and the eleventh child of Lieutenant General Sir Richard Strachey, an officer in the British colonial armed forces, and his second wife, the former Jane Grant, who became a leading supporter of the women's suffrage movement. Sir Richard Strachey GCSI FRS (1817–1908), third son of Edward Strachey and grandson of Sir Henry Strachey, 1st Baronet was born on July 24, 1817, at Sutton Court, Stowey, Somerset.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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