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Luisa Casati (January 23, 1881 – June 1, 1957)

Luisa, Marchesa Casati Stampa di Soncino, also known as Luisa Casati, was an Italian heiress, muse, and patroness of the arts in early 20th-century Europe known for her eccentricities.
Born: January 23, 1881, Milan
Died: June 1, 1957, Knightsbridge, London, United Kingdom
Lived: 32 Beaufort Gardens, SW3
Villa San Michele, Viale Axel Munthe, 34, 80071 Anacapri NA, Italy (40.5574, 14.225)
Palazzo Venier dei Leoni, Dorsoduro, 701-704, 30123 Venice, Italy (45.43082, 12.33153)
Buried: Brompton Cemetery, West Brompton, Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea, Greater London, England
Other name: Luisa, Marchesa Casati Stampa di Soncino

Luisa, Marquise Casati Stampa di Soncino was an eccentric Italian heiress, muse, and patroness of the arts in early 20th century Europe. As the concept of dandy was expanded to include women, the Marchesa Casati fitted the utmost female example by saying: "I want to be a living work of art". From 1919-1920 she lived at Villa San Michele in Capri, the tenant of the unwilling Axel Munthe. British author Compton Mackenzie in his diaries described her time on the Italian island, tolerant home to a wide collection of artists, gay men, and lesbians in exile. Her numerous portraits were painted and sculpted by artists as various as Giovanni Boldini, Paolo Troubetzkoy, Romaine Brooks (with whom she had an affair), Kees van Dongen, and Man Ray. By 1930, Casati had amassed a personal debt of $25 million. Unable to satisfy her creditors, her personal possessions were auctioned off. Rumor has it that among the bidders was Coco Chanel. She died in poverty on June 1, 1957, aged 76, and is buried under a small urn at Brompton Cemetery, London, England.
Luisa Adele Rosa Maria Von Amman (January 23, 1881 – June 1, 1957)
Beatrice Romaine Goddard aka Romaine Brooks (May 1, 1874 – Dec. 7, 1970)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
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From 1919 to 1920 Luisa Casati lived at Villa San Michele in Capri, the tenant of the unwilling Axel Munthe.
Address: Viale Axel Munthe, 34, 80071 Anacapri NA, Italy (40.5574, 14.225)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Phone: +39 081 837 1401
Place
Built around the turn of the XX century
The Villa San Michele was built on the Isle of Capri, Italy, by the Swedish physician and author Axel Munthe. The villa’s gardens have panoramic views of the town of Capri and its harbour, the Sorrentine Peninsula, and Mount Vesuvius. The villa sits on a ledge at the top of the Phoenician Steps, between Anacapri and Capri, at a height of 327 meters above sea level. San Michele’s gardens are adorned with many relics and works of art dating from ancient Egypt and other periods of classical antiquity. They now form part of the Grandi Giardini Italiani. The story of the villa is recorded by Axel Munthe in his book “The Story of San Michele,” first published in 1929 and reprinted many times since then. Between 1919 and 1920, Munthe was an unwilling landlord to the outrageous socialite and muse Luisa Casati, who took possession of Villa San Michele.
Life
Who: Luisa, Marchesa Casati Stampa di Soncino (January 23, 1881 – June 1, 1957)
Luisa Casati’s time on the Italian island, tolerant home to a wide collection of artists, gay men, and lesbians in exile, was described by British author Compton Mackenzie in his diaries. Her numerous portraits were painted and sculpted by artists as various as Giovanni Boldini, Paolo Troubetzkoy, Romaine Brooks (with whom she had an affair), Kees van Dongen, and Man Ray; many of them she paid for, as a wish to "commission her own immortality.” She was muse to Italian Futurists such as F. T. Marinetti, Fortunato Depero, and Umberto Boccioni. Augustus John’s portrait of her is one of the most popular paintings at the Art Gallery of Ontario; Jack Kerouac wrote poems about it and Robert Fulford was impressed by it as a schoolboy.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
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In 1910, Luisa Casati took up residence at the Palazzo Venier dei Leoni, on Grand Canal in Venice (now the home of the Peggy Guggenheim Collection.)
Address: Dorsoduro, 701-704, 30123 Venice, Italy (45.43082, 12.33153)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Hours: Wednesday through Monday 10.00-18.00
Phone: +39 041 240 5411
Place
Built in the XVIII century, Design by Lorenzo Boschetti (active 1709-1772)
The building was unfinished, and has an unusually low elevation on the Grand Canal. The museum’s website describes it thus: “Palazzo Venier dei Leoni’s long low façade, made of Istrian stone and set off against the trees in the garden behind that soften its lines, forms a welcome "caesura" in the stately march of Grand Canal palaces from the Accademia to the Salute.” The palace was also Peggy Guggenheim’s home for thirty years. In 1951, the palace, its garden, now called the Nasher Sculpture Garden, and her art collection were opened to the public from April to October for viewing. Her collection at the palace remained open during the summers until her death in Camposampiero, northern Italy, in 1979; she had donated the palace and the 300-piece collection to the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation in 1976. The foundation, then under the direction of Peter Lawson-Johnston, took control of the palace and the collection in 1979 and re-opened the collection there in April 1980 as the Peggy Guggenheim Collection. After the Foundation took control of the building, it took steps to expand gallery space; by 1985, "all of the rooms on the main floor had been converted into galleries ... the white Istrian stone facade and the unique canal terrace had been restored" and a protruding arcade wing, called the barchessa, had been rebuilt by architect Giorgio Bellavitis. Since 1985, the museum has been open year-round. In 1993, apartments adjacent to the museum were converted to a garden annex, a shop and more galleries. In 1995, the Nasher Sculpture Garden was completed, additional exhibition rooms were added, and a café was opened. A few years later, in 1999 and in 2000, the two neighboring properties were acquired. In 2003, a new entrance and booking office opened to cope with the increasing number of visitors, which reached 350,000 in 2007. Since 1993, the museum has doubled in size, from 2,000 to 4,000 square meters. Since 1985, the United States has selected the foundation to operate the U.S. Pavilion of the Venice Biennale, an exhibition held every other summer. In 1986, the foundation purchased the Palladian-style pavilion, built in 1930.
Life
Who: Luisa, Marchesa Casati Stampa di Soncino (January 23, 1881 – June 1, 1957)
Luisa Casati was an Italian heiress, muse, and patroness of the arts in early XX century Europe known for her eccentricities. As the concept of dandy was expanded to include women, the Marchesa Casati fitted the utmost female example by saying: "I want to be a living work of art.” In 1900, she married Camillo, Marchese Casati Stampa di Soncino (1877-1946.) The couple’s only child, Cristina Casati Stampa di Soncino, was born the following year. The Casatis maintained separate residences for the duration of their marriage. They were legally separated in 1914. They remained married until Marchese Casati’s death in 1946. She captivated artists and literary figures such as Robert de Montesquiou, Romain de Tirtoff (Erté), Jean Cocteau, and Cecil Beaton. She had a long term affair with the author Gabriele d’Annunzio, who is said to have based on her the character of Isabella Inghirami in “Forse che si forse che no” (Maybe yes, maybe no) (1910.) Her soirées at Palazzo Venier dei Leoni would become legendary. Casati collected a menagerie of exotic animals, and patronized fashion designers such as Fortuny and Poiret.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Consecrated by the Bishop of London in June 1840, Brompton Cemetery is one of Britain’s oldest and most distinguished garden cemeteries.
Address: Fulham Rd, London SW10 9UG, UK (51.48529, -0.19114)
Type: Cemetery (open to public)
Hours: Monday through Friday 9.00-16.00, Sunday 9.00-20.00
Phone: +44 20 7352 1201
English Heritage Building ID: 203792 (Grade II, 1969)
Place
Brompton Cemetery is located near Earl’s Court in west London (postal districts SW5 and SW10), in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea. It is managed by The Royal Parks, and is one of the Magnificent Seven cemeteries. Established by Act of Parliament, it opened in 1840 and was originally known as the West of London and Westminster Cemetery. Some 35,000 monuments, from simple headstones to substantial mausolea, mark the resting place of more than 205,000 burials. The site includes large plots for family mausolea, and common graves where coffins are piled deep into the earth, as well as a small columbarium. Brompton was closed to burials between 1952 and 1996, but is once again a working cemetery, with plots for interments and a “Garden of Remembrance” for the deposit of cremated remains. The cemetery has a reputation for being a popular cruising ground for gay men.
Notable queer burials at Brompton Cemetery:
• Luisa, Marchesa Casati Stampa di Soncino, infamous Italian quaintrelle, muse, eccentric and patron of the arts. The quote "Age cannot wither her, nor custom stale her infinite variety," from Shakespeare’s Antony and Cleopatra, was inscribed on her tombstone.
• Geraldine Jewsbury (1812-1880), writer.
• Emmeline Pankhurst (1858-1928), leading suffragette.
• Ernest Thesiger (1879-1961), character actor, “The Old Dark House” and “Bride of Frankenstein.”
Life
Who: Luisa, Marchesa Casati Stampa di Soncino (January 23, 1881 – June 1, 1957)
By 1930, Luisa Casati had amassed a personal debt of $25 million. Unable to pay her creditors, her personal possessions were auctioned off. Designer Coco Chanel was reportedly one of the bidders. Luisa Casati fled to London where she lived in comparative poverty in a one-room flat. She was rumoured to be seen rummaging in bins searching for feathers to decorate her hair. On June 1, 1957, Marchesa Casati died of a stroke at her last residence at 32 Beaufort Gardens, SW3 aged 76. Following a requiem mass at Brompton Oratory, the Marchesa was interred in Brompton Cemetery. She was buried wearing her black and leopard skin finery and a pair of false eyelashes. She was also interred with one of her beloved stuffed pekinese dogs. Her tombstone is a small grave marker in the shape of an urn draped in cloth with a swag of flowers to the front. The inscription on the tombstone misspells her "Louisa" rather than "Luisa.”



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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