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Mary Lloyd (January 23, 1819 – 1896)

Lived: Tan Llan, Llanelltyd, Dolgellau, Gwynedd LL40 2ST, UK (52.75838, -3.90129) [Cadw Building ID: 16146 (Grade II, 1995)]
Tyn-y-Celyn, Llanelltyd, Dolgellau, Gwynedd LL40 2TA, UK (52.75788, -3.90737) [Cadw Building ID: 5239 (Grade II, 1991)]
Hengwrt, Llanelltyd
26 Hereford Square, SW7
Rhagatt Hall, Rhagatt, Corwen, Denbighshire, LL21 9HY, UK (52.98415, -3.34396)
Buried: Saint Illtud Church Cemetery, Llanelltyd, Gwynedd, Wales
Buried alongside: Frances Power Cobbe

Frances Power Cobbe was an Irish writer, social reformer, anti-vivisection activist, and leading women's suffrage campaigner. She formed a marriage with sculptor Mary Lloyd, whom she met in Rome in 1861 and lived with from 1864 until Lloyd's death. Cobbe referred to Lloyd alternately as "husband," "wife," and "dear friend." Cobbe founded the Society for the Protection of Animals Liable to Vivisection in 1875, the world's first organization campaigning against animal experiments, and in 1898 the BUAV. Cobbe was a member of the executive council of the London National Society for Women's Suffrage and writer of editorial columns for London newspapers on suffrage, property rights for women, and opposition to vivisection. Lloyd studied and worked with French artist Rosa Bonheur. In 1853, she worked in the studio of Welsh sculptor John Gibson in Rome, along with sculptor Harriet Hosmer. In 1858, Lloyd inherited a share in the Welsh landed estate of Hengwrt. This allowed Lloyd to refer to herself as a landed proprietor when signing petitions supporting women's suffrage, and gave her some local political rights, such as the ability to appoint a vicar. They are buried together in the churchyard at Llanelltyd, Wales.
Together from 1861 to 1896: 35 years.
Frances Power Cobbe (December 4, 1822 – April 5, 1904)
Mary Charlotte Lloyd (January 23, 1819 – 1896)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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Rhagatt Hall is located in a landscaped park on the north side of the B5437, 1km. approx. west of Carrog.
Address: Rhagatt, Corwen, Denbighshire, LL21 9HY, UK (52.98415, -3.34396)
Type: Private Property
Cadw Building ID: 15562 (Grade II, 1995)
Place
The existence of an estate at Rhagatt can be documented from the late XIV century. The house was described as “old” in 1803, and the rear wing of the present house may incorporate parts of a down-hill sited building of possible XVII century date. However the main block is largely of 1819-20, when an earlier building was extended and remodelled for Edward Lloyd, whose family had acquired the estate in 1804. The external detail of the rear wing is also largely early XIX century or later. The interior of the house was again restored and substantially remodelled ca. 1970. Rhagatt Hall has roughly coursed and squared stone to entrance and garden fronts, rougher rubble to rear west elevation; slate roofs. 2 storeyed. Entrance front faces east and is a 3 window range with advanced pedimented central bay. Entrance with recessed doorway renewed ca. 1970 (formerly with columns in antis.) Flanking 12-pane sash windows, with 9-pane sashes to first floor and above the entrance. Right hand windows appear to be inserted, and the scars of earlier openings are visible alongside them. Similar scars to left of entrance may indicate the blockings of windows which were themselves later insertions. A length of wall perpendicular to the building line divides the main part of the house from the service wing, which has 2 x12-pane sash windows to first floor, inserted openings below. Garden front has twin full height bows, the boldly overhanging eaves of the hipped roof carried straight across them. Each has a floor length 12-pane sash window to ground floor, and a 6-pane sash above. Long rear west elevation has 2 long casement windows to lower right, with 6-pane sash windows above; a stair window (reduced in length) and a blocked doorway (apparently cut by the present stairs) in the angle with a projecting full-height bow. Paired long casement windows (inserted) in the bow, and further inserted openings in the 2-window range beyond. Cross wing to left may be of early origin, but was remodelled ca. 1970. Rhagatt is of historical interest as a small country house, the seat of an old-established estate. The early XIX century re-working of older buildings on the site is a distinctive exercise in simple Neo-Classical villa-architecture.
Life
Who: Mary Charlotte Lloyd (January 23, 1819 – 1896)
Rhagatt Hall is the family home of Mary Lloyd, daughter of Edward Lloyd, who later became the life companion of Frances Power Cobbe (1822-1904.)



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Frances Power Cobbe (1822-1904), feminist writer, lived with Mary Lloyd at 26 Hereford Square, SW7 from 1862 to 1884.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

In 1858 Mary Lloyd inherited a share in the Welsh landed estate of Hengwrt. This allowed Lloyd to refer to herself as a landed proprietor when signing petitions supporting women’s suffrage, and also gave her some local political rights, such as the ability to appoint a vicar.
Addresses:
Tan Llan, Llanelltyd, Dolgellau, Gwynedd LL40 2ST, UK (52.75838, -3.90129) [Cadw Building ID: 16146 (Grade II, 1995)]
Tyn-y-Celyn, Llanelltyd, Dolgellau, Gwynedd LL40 2TA, UK (52.75788, -3.90737) [Cadw Building ID: 5239 (Grade II, 1991)]
Place
Llanelltyd is a small village and community in Gwynedd, to the north of Dolgellau. The Community population taken at the 2011 Census was 514. It is home to the XII century Cymer Abbey, a grade I listed building. St Illtyd’s church, one of the oldest parish churches in Wales, is a grade II listed building. A late Medieval church retaining much of its historic character and with the special interest of its XVIII century vernacular porch and fenestration. Hengwrt, Llanelltyd (near Dolgellau) was the home of Robert Vaughan (1592-1667.) He was the eminent Welsh antiquary and collector of manuscripts (later known as the Hengwrt-Peniarth Library.) A later Georgian Mansion was built on the site 1750-54. Mary Lloyd had a one-third share in the Welsh estate of Hengwrt by way of her sister Frances and her husband, Robert Williams Vaughan. They died childless; Vaughan willed a life interest in Hengwrt to his wife’s three unmarried sisters, Mary, Jane, and Harriet. This was rebuilt and remodelled in the XIX century. The house was destroyed by fire in 1962, but the three outbuildings, much remodeled, remain, and the site still has a clear view of the church of St Illtyd’s, where Cobbe and Lloyd are buried. Mary Lloyd and Frances Power Cobbe lived at Tan Llan, a house on the edge of Llanelltyd. Tan Llan is a mid-XVIII century house, said formerly to have been dated 1728. Long a dower house of the Nannau estate, it was altered and extended in the late XIX century. Located across the river from the idyllic little market town of Dolgellau, Llanelltyd was then “a scattering of some twenty cottages.” Lloyd was, in effect, its resident squire; the church living was in the gift of Hengwrt, which also owned much of the farmland. Tan Llan is situated at the eastern extremity of Llanelltyd village some 50m south east of the main road; sited against the gentle slope of the hill and accessed via a metalled drive leading east from the church lane. A L-shaped two-and-a-half-storey primary house with one-and-a-half-storey service range adjoining to the north east. Rubble construction with overlapping stone coping to gable parapets with moulded kneelers; tall end chimneys with moulded capping andweather-coursing. 3-window symmetrical main south east front with Victorian fenestration. Central entrance with part-glazed door behind large XX century conservatory; flanking storied, canted baywindows with plain sashes. Similar, smaller sash windows to thefirst-floor centre and the second floor, the latter contained within gabled rubble dormers; deep verges and plain bargeboards. XIX century single-storey extensions to the rear with modern windows and amodern upper door with bridge access to the banked garden behind. The connecting service range is set back and has 3 gabled dormersas before with large 6-pane Victorian sashes. Below, further 6-pane windows of differing size and an off-centre entrance to left with French doors; plain off-centre stack to right. Modern extension to the north east. Inside, a fine full-height original oak dog-leg stair with moulded rail and turned balusters, with similar gallery at the top; decorative tread-ends. The lower flight has lost its balusters. Four XVIII century 6-panel doors (raised and fielded) with simply moulded architraves to first floor; 4 similar doors of painted pine to the attic floor. Ground-floor living room left has fireplace made up of sections of small-field XVIII century oak panelling (raised and fielded as before.) A large earlier XVIII century vernacular house with Victorian alterations, retaining some good XVIII century internal detail. Group value with the coach house and stable block at Tan Llan. The census of 1891 found Cobbe and Lloyd living at Tyn-y-Celyn, Llanelltyd, with three servants. Dated 1773 Tyn-y-Celyn is formerly the home of Henry Griffiths, timber merchant. Early XIX century alterations and later XIX century cross-range. Tyn-y-Celyn is below the A 496 to west of the junction with the A 470; set back from the by-road that runs through the village; rubble boundary wall with ball finials to gated entry at left. Rubble revetment wall to hillside at rear. Symmetrical 3-window, 2 storey and attic front; rubble construction with slate roof, gable parapets and tall end chimneys with plain capping and weather-coursing. Distinctive central gable in the form of a pediment with 6-pane oculus, characteristic of the area; stone spout to right. Massive stone lintels to 16-pane sash windows ; continuous cills to first floor forming band beneath windows; the front formerly had a verandah. Inscribed slate date plaque to centre over modern 12-pane glazed door. The right gable has one attic casement and a small-pane window over a modern rubble porch. 1 window cross-range beyond with 4-pane casement windows and 12-pane and 9-pane sashes. Set in the slope at the left end is a lower XIX century cross-wing set at an angle to the original house; similar construction including boulder plinth to the rear. The range diminishes in height towards the rear, the left-hand windows therefore being stepped-up. Mostly 4-pane sashes to the first floor. The main entrance has been moved from the front to the right-hand side. The main ground-floor rooms retain Georgian detail including 6-panel doors and panelled shutters; the drawing room has architraves with bosses and the dining room has plainarched recesses. Original dog-leg stairs with swept-up hand rail, shaped tread-ends and turned balusters. Twin purlin pegged trusses. Listed as a late XVIII century regional house retaining much of its internal and external character.
Life
Who: Mary Charlotte Lloyd (January 23, 1819 – 1896)
Mary Lloyd was a Welsh sculptor who lived for decades with feminist Frances Power Cobbe (1822-1904.) She was the 8th of 17 children born to Edward Lloyd of Rhagatt and his wife, Frances Maddocks. She may have lived for a time with a maiden aunt, Margaret Lloyd of Berth. Born about 1780, Margaret Lloyd was a friend of the Ladies of Llangollen (Llangollen is ten miles to the east of Rhagatt Hall, on the great road from London to Holyhead and Dublin.) Mary inherited several books inscribed “M. Lloyd. The gift of Lady Eleanor Butler and Miss Ponsonby” and also some letters written to her aunt Margaret by the poet Felicia Hemans, who until 1831 lived less than ten miles from Berth. Mary Lloyd studied and worked with French artist Rosa Bonheur. In 1853 she was working in the studio of Welsh sculptor John Gibson in Rome, along with American sculptor Harriet Hosmer. When Cobbe and Lloyd met in the winter of 1861-62, both were mature single women (Cobbe was 39, Lloyd was 43) who had some private income, lived alone, and were fond of animals. Mary Lloyd died in 1896. Responding to letters of condolence, Cobbe wrote that she had died “bravely resting on my arm & telling me we should not long be separated.” She was buried as they had planned in the Saint Illtud's churchyard, in a double plot that left room for Cobbe to rest beside her under the single headstone.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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Tags: days of love, queer places
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