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Paul Edward Paget (January 24, 1901 – August 13, 1985)

Paul Edward Paget was the son of Henry Luke Paget, Bishop of Chester and Elmer Katie Hoare. He became business partner of John Seely, whom he met at Cambridge and with whom he restored many damaged church buildings after World War II.
Born: January 24, 1901
Died: 1985, Frogshall, United Kingdom
Lived: Mottistone Manor, Longstone Farmhouse, Strawberry Lane, Mottistone, Newport, Isle of Wight PO30 4ED, UK (50.65174, -1.42821)
Templewood, Frogshall, Northrepps, Norfolk
Buried: St Michael, Starling Rise, Sidestrand, Norfolk, NR27 0NJ

Mottistone Manor is a National Trust property in the village of Mottistone on the Isle of Wight. It has popular gardens and is a listed building. It was first mentioned in documents related to the Domesday Book.
Address: Longstone Farmhouse, Strawberry Lane, Mottistone, Newport, Isle of Wight PO30 4ED, UK (50.65174, -1.42821)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Phone: +44 1983 741020
Place
The oldest parts of the manor, the south-east wing, date from the XV or early XVI century. The north-west wing was added or remodelled by Thomas Cheke in 1567, and additions to the south-east wing were made in the early XVII century. The whole house was remodelled in the 1920s by the architects Seely and Paget, Henry John Alexander Seely, 2nd Baron Mottistone (1899–1963) of the firm being a great-grandson of Charles Seely (1803–1887), who had bought the house and estate in 1861. Though not open to the public, the manor has hosted gatherings for the Seely family. The great-great granddaughter of General J. E. B. Seely, 1st Baron Mottistone, the theatre and opera director Sophie Hunter, held her wedding reception here with Benedict Cumberbatch on February 14, 2015.
Life
Who: Henry John Alexander Seely, 2nd Baron Mottistone (1899–1963)
'The Shack' is a small caravan in the grounds of Mottistone Manor in which the Hon. John Seeley and Paul Paget spent weekends. Seeley later inherited the title Lord Mottistone. The pair were founders of an architectural practice that flourished from the 1920s to the 1960s as Seeley & Paget. The firm is best known for their church architecture and the business partners were also life partners. Entertaining lavishly at Mottistone Manor the pair retreated at night to The Shack where they slept in bunks at either end of their tiny space - while guests relaxed in the more comfortable rooms of the Manor. This sleeping arrangement enabled them to avoid accusations of a sexual relationship when necessary. The interior of the The Shack was designed by the architects in chrome and plywood in the Modern movement style - while the outside is more rustic. Though small inside, there were luxuries such as heated chromed steel pipes formed into a ladder up to the bunk beds so they went to bed with warm feet. The Manor is in private ownership but the National Trust now admits visitors to The Shack as part of visits to the Mottistone estate and gardens. John Seely and Paul Paget also designed Eltham Palace, which hosted “The Queens of Eltham Palace” event for LGBT History Month 2012.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Templewood house was built 1938 as shooting box and base for other country activities for Samuel Hoare, Lord Templewood by Paul Edward Paget of the architectural firm Seely and Paget. The house incorporates fragments from the old Bank of England by John Soane, and from Nuthall Temple which stood in Nottinghamshire and was one of only four houses built in the United Kingdom generally said to have been inspired by Palladio's Villa Capra in Vicenza. Nuthall Temple was demolished in 1929. The two sphinxes which flank the terrace in front of the portico were salvaged from Nuthall Temple. The four columns which support the portico were salvaged from Soane’s Old Bank of England. The listed building is in excellent condition and is set in parkland and approached down a long chestnut tree-lined avenue.
Address: Northrepps, Norfolk NR27 0LJ, UK (52.89486, 1.34922)
Type: Private Property
English Heritage Building ID: 224676 (Grade II, 1988)
Place
Built in 1938, Design by John Seely and Paul Paget for the latter's uncle Sir Samuel Hoare, Viscount Templewood.
Painted brick, now pink but originally a warm yellow; lead roofs. Rectangular in plan, with rectangular ranges across west and east faces. Single storey west façade of 7 bays. Rendered plinth. Sash windows with glazing bars. Central 3-bay portico with 4 Ionic columns from the Taylor/Soane Bank of England supported on a rendered plinth; pediment over with Templewood's coat of arms in high relief; central double-leaved door with semicircular head, lower panels blank and upper 2 panels of each glazed. Each window of the flanking wings has apron and a continuous band to sill and head. Plain parapet. Statues on extreme corners in glass-fibre by Edwin Russell c1965. The entrance is reached by a shallow flight of stone steps flanked by 2 XVIII century stone sphinxes all from Nuthall Temple, Nottinghamshire by Thomas Wright (demolished 1929). To the left of the facade a screen wall with 6 blind rusticated arches. 7-bay south front has a double perron with stone and timber balustrade from Nuthall leading to a 3-bay loggia with 4 Bank of England columns; one bay to each side with sash windows and all 5 bays with a plain cornice and wrought iron roof balustrade by Bakewell of Derby also from Nuthall. 2 flanking wings project each with a sash with louvred shutters in the gable-end; bands and plain parapet as west front. Clerestorey above centre 5 bays with 3 oculi with radiating glazing bars and a stone festoon over the central opening. Semicircular terrace to the west front with similar balustrade from Nuthall. Central door with fanlight having 2 vertical glazing bars; sash to either side. 2 flanking bays project slightly having sashes with shutters. Plain cornice and wrought iron balustrade above centre 3 bays. Clerestorey with central oculus. Service entrance to north. Interior. Large central saloon with coved ceiling painted in 1964 with the life of Paul Paget by Brian Thomas. Modest apartments round the perimeter of the saloon.
Life
Who: Paul Edward Paget (January 24, 1901 – August 13, 1985)
Paul Paget was the son of Henry Luke Paget, Bishop of Chester and Elmer Katie Hoare (daughter of Sir Samuel Hoare). He became business partner of John Seely (later Lord Mottistone), whom he met at Cambridge and with whom he restored many damaged church buildings after WWII. From 1926 he had been a successful designer of opulent houses, including the former Eltham Palace, and claimed that he looked after 14 city churches. In his partnership with Seely he concentrated more on their clients than on design work. He succeeded Seely as surveyor to St Paul’s Cathedral in 1963 and designed or restored many churches. He was master of the Art Workers Guild in 1971. In August 1971 Paget married Verily Anderson in London, England. He was invested as a Fellow of the Royal Institute of British Architects (FRIBA) and a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries (FSA). He was also a Commander, Royal Victorian Order (CVO). Paul retired to Templewood in Frogshall, Northrepps, Norfolk, a building he had designed for his uncle Samuel Hoare, Viscount Templewood. He is buried at St Michael (Starling Rise, Sidestrand, Norfolk, NR27 0NJ)



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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