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Virginia Woolf (January 25, 1882 – March 28, 1941)

Adeline Virginia Woolf, known professionally as Virginia Woolf, was an English writer and one of the foremost modernists of the twentieth century.
Born: January 25, 1882, Kensington, London, United Kingdom
Died: March 28, 1941, River Ouse, Sussex
Education: King's College London
Lived: Monk’s House, Rodmell, Lewes, East Sussex BN7 3HF, UK (50.83881, 0.01652)
17 The Green, Richmond, Greater London TW9, UK (51.46285, -0.30691)
Hogarth House, 34 Paradise Rd, Richmond, Greater London TW9 1SE, UK
38 Brunswick Square, London WC1N 1AE, UK (51.52383, -0.12409)
Burley House, 15 Cambridge Park, Twickenham
Asham House, Beddingham, A26, Lewes, East Sussex BN8, UK (50.84041, 0.06302)
The Round House, Pipe Passage, Lewes, East Sussex BN7 1YQ, UK (50.87282, 0.0066)
Hotel Café Royal, 68 Regent Street, W1B
9 St Aubyns, Hove
Talland House, Albert Rd, St. Ives, St Ives, Cornwall TR26, UK (50.20921, -5.47883)
37 Mecklenburgh Square, London WC1N 2AB, UK
29 Fitzroy Square, Fitzrovia, London W1T 6EU, UK
22 Hyde Park Gate, Kensington, London SW7 5DH, UK
46 Gordon Square, Kings Cross, London WC1H 0PD, UK (51.52445, -0.13018)
52 Tavistock Square, Kings Cross, London WC1H, UK (51.5247, -0.12791)
Buried: Monk's House Grounds, Rodmell, Lewes District, East Sussex, England, Plot: Ashes Buried Beneath an Elm Tree in the Garden.
Movies: Mrs. Dalloway, Orlando, To the Lighthouse, Golven, Simple Gifts, A Room of One's Own
Siblings: Vanessa Bell, Thoby Stephen, Adrian Stephen, more

Adeline Virginia Woolf was an English writer, and one of the foremost modernists of the 20th century. During the interwar period, Woolf was a significant figure in London literary society and a central figure in the influential Bloomsbury Group of intellectuals. Her most famous works include the novels Mrs. Dalloway (1925), To the Lighthouse (1927) and Orlando (1928), and the book-length essay A Room of One's Own (1929), with its famous dictum, "A woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction.“ Virginia Stephen married writer Leonard Woolf on August 10, 1912. Despite his low material status (Woolf referring to Leonard during their engagement as a "penniless Jew") the couple shared a close bond. Indeed, in 1937, Woolf wrote in her diary: "Love-making—after 25 years can't bear to be separate ... you see it is enormous pleasure being wanted: a wife. And our marriage so complete." In 1922, she met Vita Sackville-West. After a tentative start, they began a sexual relationship, which, according to Sackville-West, was only twice consummated. In 1928, Woolf presented Sackville-West with Orlando, a fantastical biography in which the eponymous hero's life spans three centuries and both sexes. After their affair ended, the two women remained friends until Woolf's death in 1941. Virginia committed suicide by drowning at the age of 59. Leonard died in 1969 from a stroke and was cremated with his ashes being buried beneath an elm tree in his beloved garden at Monk's House, with his wife's ashes, in Rodmell, Sussex.
Together from 1912 to 1941: 29 years.
Leonard Sidney Woolf (November 25, 1880 – August 14, 1969)
Adeline Virginia Woolf (nee Stephen; January 25, 1882 – March 28, 1941)



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Virginia Woolf was born Adeline Virginia Stephen at 22 Hyde Park Gate in Kensington, London. Her parents were Sir Leslie Stephen (1832–1904) and Julia Prinsep Duckworth Stephen (née Jackson, 1846–1895.)
Address: Hyde Park Gate, Kensington, London SW7 5DH, UK
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
Place
Hyde Park Gate is a street in central London, which applies to two parallel roads in Kensington on the southern boundary of Kensington Gardens. It is probably most famous for having the former residence and death place of Sir Winston Churchill. It is in a picturesque part of London and a very expensive place to live.
Notable queer residents at Hyde Park Gate:
• English Heritage Blue Plaque: 9 Hyde Park Gate, SW7 Robert Baden-Powell (1857-1941), “Chief Scout of the World lived here.”
• English Heritage Blue Plaque: 22 Hyde Park Gate, SW7 Sir Leslie Stephen (1832-1904), “Scholar and writer lived here.”
Life
Who: Adeline Virginia Woolf, née Stephen (January 25, 1882 – March 28, 1941)
Leslie Stephen was a notable historian, author, critic and mountaineer. He was a founding editor of the Dictionary of National Biography, a work that would influence Virginia Woolf’s later experimental biographies. Julia Stephen was born in British India to Dr. John and Maria Pattle Jackson. She was the niece of the photographer Julia Margaret Cameron and first cousin of the temperance leader Lady Henry Somerset. Julia moved to England with her mother, where she served as a model for Pre-Raphaelite painters such as Edward Burne-Jones. Julia named her daughter after the Pattle family: Adeline after Lady Henry’s sister, who married George Russell, 10th Duke of Bedford; and Virginia, the name of yet another sister (who died young) but also of their mother, Julia’s aunt. Woolf was educated by her parents in their literate and well-connected household. Her parents had each been married previously and been widowed, and, consequently, the household contained the children of three marriages. Julia had three children by her first husband, Herbert Duckworth: George, Stella, and Gerald Duckworth. Leslie had first married Harriet Marian (Minny) Thackeray (1840–1875), the daughter of William Thackeray, and they had one daughter: Laura Makepeace Stephen, who was declared mentally disabled and lived with the family until she was institutionalised in 1891. Leslie and Julia had four children together: Vanessa Stephen (later known as Vanessa Bell) (1879), Thoby Stephen (1880), Virginia (1882), and Adrian Stephen (1883.) Sir Leslie Stephen’s eminence as an editor, critic, and biographer, and his connection to William Thackeray, meant that his children were raised in an environment filled with the influences of Victorian literary society. Henry James, George Henry Lewes, and Virginia’s honorary godfather, James Russell Lowell, were among the visitors to the house. Julia Stephen was equally well connected. She came from a family of beauties who left their mark on Victorian society as models for Pre-Raphaelite artists and early photographers, including her aunt Julia Margaret Cameron who was also a visitor to the Stephen household. Supplementing these influences was the immense library at the Stephens’ house, from which Virginia and Vanessa were taught the classics and English literature. Unlike the girls, their brothers Adrian and Julian (Thoby) were formally educated and sent to Cambridge, a difference that Virginia would resent. The sisters did, however, benefit indirectly from their brothers’ Cambridge contacts, as the boys brought their new intellectual friends home to the Stephens’ drawing room. After the death of their parents and Virginia’s second nervous breakdown, Vanessa and Adrian sold 22 Hyde Park Gate and bought a house at 46 Gordon Square in Bloomsbury.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
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According to Virginia Woolf’s memoirs, her most vivid childhood memories were not of London but of St Ives, Cornwall, where the family spent every summer until 1895.
Address: Albert Rd, St. Ives, St Ives, Cornwall TR26, UK (50.20921, -5.47883)
Type: Guest facility (open to public)
Phone: +44 1736 755050
English Heritage Building ID: 68918 (Grade II, 1972)
Place
The Stephens’ summer home, Talland House, looked out over Porthminster Bay, and is still standing, though somewhat altered. Memories of these family holidays and impressions of the landscape, especially the Godrevy Lighthouse, informed the fiction Woolf wrote in later years, most notably “To the Lighthouse”: “It still makes me feel warm; as if everything were ripe; humming; sunny… The gardens gave off a murmur of bees… The buzz, the croon, the smell… it was rapture.” Virginia Woolf cherished early memories of St Ives, where she spent summers until she was 13 - the year her mother died. Today, the family’s colonial-style Victorian villa retreat is available as holiday apartments. Buildings have grown up around it, but there are still views across the bay to the lighthouse on Godrevy Island, the inspiration for “To the Lighthouse” with its themes of transience and loss. Woolf set the novel in Skye, transplanting the flora and scenery of the balmy south-west. Overlooking Porthminster Beach, with its terrific café, Talland House is away from the busy centre of this town of fishermen’s cottages, cobbled streets, galleries and craft shops.
Life
Who: Adeline Virginia Woolf, née Stephen (January 25, 1882 – March 28, 1941)
The sudden death of her mother in 1895, when Virginia was 13, and that of her half-sister Stella two years later, led to the first of Virginia’s several nervous breakdowns. She was, however, able to take courses of study (some at degree level) in Ancient Greek, Latin, German and history at the Ladies’ Department of King’s College London between 1897 and 1901. This brought her into contact with some of the early reformers of women’s higher education such as the principal of the Ladies’ Department, Lilian Faithfull (one of the so-called Steamboat ladies) and Clara Pater (sister of the more famous Walter, George Warr.) Her sister Vanessa also studied Latin, Italian, art and architecture at King’s Ladies’ Department. In 2013 Woolf was honoured by her alma mater with the opening of a building named after her on Kingsway. The death of her father in 1904 provoked her most alarming collapse and she was briefly institutionalised. She spent time recovering at her friend, Violet Dickinson, and at her aunt’s house in Cambridge. Modern scholars (including her nephew and biographer, Quentin Bell) have suggested her breakdowns and subsequent recurring depressive periods were also influenced by the sexual abuse to which she and her sister Vanessa were subjected by their half-brothers George and Gerald Duckworth (which Woolf recalls in her autobiographical essays “A Sketch of the Past” and “22 Hyde Park Gate.”)



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From 1897 to 1900 Virginia Woolf, then known as Virginia Stephens, stayed with her family at 9 St Aubyns, Hove.



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English Heritage Blue Plaque: 46 Gordon Square, John Maynard Keynes (1883–1946), "Economist lived here 1916–1946"
Addresses:
46 Gordon Square, Kings Cross, London WC1H 0PD, UK (51.52445, -0.13018)
51 Gordon Square, London WC1H, UK (51.52419, -0.12987)
52 Tavistock Square, Kings Cross, London WC1H, UK (51.5247, -0.12791)
Place
Gordon Square is in Bloomsbury, in the London Borough of Camden, London (postal district WC1) part of the Bedford Estate. Gordon Square was developed by master builder Thomas Cubitt in the 1820s, as one of a pair with Tavistock Square, which is a block away and has the same dimensions. As with most London squares the central garden was originally for the private use of the residents of the surrounding houses, but it now belongs to the University of London and is open to the public. The square is named after the second wife of the 6th Duke of Bedford, Lady Georgiana Gordon, daughter of Alexander Gordon, 4th Duke of Gordon. The university owns many of the buildings in the square and in early 2005 it submitted an application for a refurbishment of the square, including the reinstatement of railings similar to the originals. The work was completed in 2007. The west side of the square is dominated by the listed church of Christ the King and next to it the home of Dr Williams’s Library.
Notable queer resident at Gordon & Tavistock Square:
• James Strachey (September 26, 1887 - April 25, 1967), Lytton’s brother, lived at n. 41 Gordon Square, WC1H from 1919-56, with his wife, Alix, sometimes joined by Ralph Partridge.
• The economist John Maynard Keynes (1883–1946) lived at no. 46 Gordon Square, WC1H marked by a blue plaque. Before Keynes moved in, the same house was occupied by a young Virginia Woolf (1882-1941) and her siblings (including the noted painter and interior designer Vanessa Bell (1879-1961)) from 1905 to 1907 and frequented by other members of the Bloomsbury Group.
• Vanessa Bell moved into no. 50 Gordon Square, WC1H in 1920, moving to no. 37 Gordon Square, WC1H from 1922-29, with Clive Bell moving into no. 50.
• English Heritage Blue Plaque: 51 Gordon Square, Bloomsbury, WC1H Lytton Strachey (1880-1932), “Critic and biographer lived here.” Strachey moved here shortly after writing “Eminent Victorians” (1918), his controversial critique of Victorian values which set new parameters in the art of biography. In Gordon Square Strachey produced its follow-up, “Queen Victoria” (1921), another debunker of Victorian myths.
• From 1924 to 1939 Virginia Woolf lived at no. 52 Tavistock Square, WC1H south side of square: bombed in October, 1940 and replaced by the Tavistock Hotel in 1951.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
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English Heritage Blue Plaque: 33 Fitzroy Square, Roger Fry (1866–1934), “In this house Roger Fry 1866–1934 Artist and Art Critic ran the Omega Workshops 1913–1919"
Address: Fitzroy Square, Fitzrovia, London W1T 6EU, UK
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
Place
Fitzroy Square is one of the Georgian squares in London and is the only one found in the central London area known as Fitzrovia. The square, nearby Fitzroy Street, and the Fitzroy Tavern in Charlotte Street have the family name of Charles FitzRoy, 2nd Duke of Grafton, into whose ownership the land passed through his marriage. His descendant Charles FitzRoy, 1st Baron Southampton developed the area during the late XVIII and early XIX century. Fitzroy Square was a speculative development intended to provide London residences for aristocratic families, and was built in four stages. Leases for the eastern and southern sides, designed by Robert Adam, were granted in 1792; building began in 1794 and was completed in 1798 by Adam’s brothers James and William. These buildings are fronted in Portland stone brought by sea from Dorset. The Napoleonic Wars and a slump in the London property market brought a temporary stop to construction of the square after the south and east sides were completed. According to the records of the Squares Frontagers’ Committee, 1815 residents looked out on “vacant ground, the resort of the idle and profligate.” Another contemporary account describes the incomplete square: “The houses are faced with stone, and have a greater proportion of architectural excellence and embellishment than most others in the metropolis. They were designed by the Adams, but the progress of the late war prevented the completion of the design. It is much to be regretted, that it remains in its present unfinished state.” The northern and western sides were subsequently constructed in 1827-1829 and 1832-1835 respectively, and are stucco-fronted. The south side suffered bomb damage during WWII and was rebuilt with traditional facades to remain in keeping with the rest of the square.
Notable queer residents at Fitzroy Square:
• No. 8, W1T was the home of the painter James McNeill Whistler (1834-1903.)
• No. 19, W1T was the base for the “International School” run by Louise Michel in the 1890s. Later, from 1909 to 1911, was the home of Bloomsbury Group artist Duncan Grant (1885-1978.)
• No. 21, W1T was Roger Fry (December 14, 1866 –September 9, 1934)’s studio
• No. 22, W1T was Duncan Grant’s studio.
• No. 26, W1T Duncan Grant and John Maynard Keynes shared a flat.
• Engligh Heritage Blue Plaque: 29 Fitzroy Square, W1T Virginia Woolf, née Stephen (1882–1941), "Novelist and Critic lived here 1907–1911" Also George Bernard Shaw lived here from 1887 until his marriage in 1898.
• No. 33, W1T housed Roger Fry (1866-1934)’s Omega Workshop, creating avant-garde furniture from 1913 to 1919.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
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Throughout her life, Virginia Woolf was plagued by periodic mood swings and associated illnesses. She spent three short periods in 1910, 1912 and 1913 at Burley House, 15 Cambridge Park, Twickenham, described as "a private nursing home for women with nervous disorder.” Though this instability often affected her social life, her literary productivity continued with few breaks throughout her life.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Brunswick Square is a public garden in Bloomsbury, in the London Borough of Camden.
Address: 38 Brunswick Square, London WC1N 1AE, UK (51.52383, -0.12409)
Type: Private Property
Place
Brunswick Square is overlooked by the School of Pharmacy and the Foundling Museum to the north and the Brunswick Centre to the west. South of it lies International Hall (a hall of residence of the University of London), and on its west side are the two separate but related children's charities, Coram Family and Coram's Fields. What is now Brunswick Square was originally fields that were part of the grounds of the Foundling Hospital. It was planned to be leased for housebuilding, along with Mecklenburgh Square, to raise funds for the hospital in 1790. Brunswick Square, named after Caroline of Brunswick, was finished first, being built by James Burton in 1795–1802; none of the houses remain. Leafy squares characterise the Bloomsbury district of London. Mecklenburgh Square is a matching square to the east. Russell Square is the nearest tube station to the south-west. In Jane Austen's book “Emma,” the characters of Mr. and Mrs. John Knightley make their residence in Brunswick Square.
Notable queer residents at Brunswick Square:
• The writer E.M. Forster (January 1, 1879 –June 7, 1970) used no. 26, WC1N as his London base from 1930 to 1939.
• Virginia Woolf, from 1911 to 1912, lived at no. 38, WC1N north side of the square (demolished in about 1936 and replaced by the School of Pharmacy of the University of London.)



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
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ISBN-10: 1532906315
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Virginia Woolf spent holidays and weekends during 1912–19 at Asham House, just off the road between Lewes and Newhaven. The house was then surrounded by the cement works that opened in 1932 and became derelict. It was demolished on July 12, 1994, to allow expansion of Beddingham landfill site.
Address: A26, Lewes, East Sussex BN8, UK (50.84041, 0.06302)
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
English Heritage Building ID: 292742 (Grade II, 1952)
Place
Beddingham is a village in the Lewes district of East Sussex. The area was settled in pre-Roman times with many tumuli in the surrounding hills originating in the Iron Age. The Roman villa at Beddingham was excavated by David Rudling between 1987 and 1992. Construction began in the late first century AD, and the villa was occupied until the mid fourth-century. There was a wooden roundhouse built originally (around 50 AD) before Roman construction began towards the end of the century. When the Saxons came, one of the buildings on the site was hollowed out, presumably to be used as a Sunken Feature Building (Grubenhaus). It is interesting that the fill of the cut contains a mix of Late Roman and Early Saxon pottery, suggesting some degree of continuity of settlement. Beddingham was a Saxon royal minster. It was probably seized by Offa of Mercia following his annexation of Sussex early in the 770s. One of his coins was found there. Once back in Saxon possession, the land was bequeathed by King Alfred to his nephew Aethelm, and the manor was later held by Earl Godwin. The manor of Preston in Beddingham (or 'Preston Becklewin') was originally held by the Abbey of Bec and passed to King's College, Cambridge, at its foundation. The original church was wooden. The Normans used local flint from the South Downs to construct the present building. The XIII century farmhouse at Itford Farm (Grade II* listed) is being converted into a youth hostel (YHA) and outdoor activity centre to be known as YHA South Downs, and is due to open in Spring 2013.
Life
Who: Adeline Virginia Woolf, née Stephen (January 25, 1882 – March 28, 1941) and Leonard Sidney Woolf (November 25, 1880 – August 14, 1969)
Asham - or Asheham, as it was originally spelt, and as Virginia spells it in her diaries - was the house Leonard and Virginia Woolf occupied for holidays and weekends from 1912, just before their marriage, to 1919, when they had to surrender the lease to the owner. It stood just off the road between Lewes and Newhaven, in East Sussex, near the village of Beddingham. Asham House was where she and Leonard spent the night of their wedding and where they entertained the leading intellectuals and artists of the time. Above all it was associated with her creative self. During her years there she completed her first novel “The Voyage Out,” and did much of the work on “Night and Day.” Asham was where she renewed herself as a writer.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
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In October 1914, Leonard and Virginia Woolf moved to Richmond, where they occupied rooms in a house on the east side of The Green: number 17. Leonard describes some amusing incidents which he experienced here in the volume of his autobiography called “Beginning again.” (1964).
Address: 17 The Green, Richmond, Greater London TW9, UK (51.46285, -0.30691)
Type: Private Property
English Heritage Building ID: 205665 (Grade II, 1950)
Place
Richmond Green is a recreation area located near the centre of Richmond, a town of about 20,000 inhabitants situated in south west London. Owned by the Crown Estate, it is leased to the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames. The Green is essentially square in shape and its open grassland, framed with broadleaf trees, extends to roughly twelve acres. It is overlooked by a mixture of period townhouses, historic buildings and municipal and commercial establishments including the Richmond Lending Library and Richmond Theatre. For over 400 years, Richmond Green has been edged by houses and commercial premises – built to provide accommodation for people serving or visiting Richmond Palace. In 1625 Charles I brought his court here to escape the plague in London and by the early XVIII century these had become the homes of "minor nobility, diplomats, and court hangers-on". The construction of the railway in the mid-XIX century cut the Green off from Old Deer Park, and led to the building of Victorian villas for the more prosperous commuters to London. The A316 road, built in the early XX century, worsened this separation.
Life
Who: Adeline Virginia Woolf, née Stephen (January 25, 1882 – March 28, 1941)
Virginia and Leonard Woolf lived in Richmond, a suburb just 15 minutes from central London by train, from 1915 to 1924. They occupied two houses during their years there. The first was rooms in number 17 on the east side of The Green, which is still considered “one of the most beautiful urban greens surviving anywhere in England.”



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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English Heritage Blue Plaque: Hogarth House, 34 Paradise Road, “In this house Leonard (1880–1969) and Virginia Woolf (1882–1941) lived 1915–1924 and founded the Hogarth Press 1917"
Address: Paradise Rd, Richmond, Greater London TW9 1SE, UK
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
English Heritage Building ID: 205596 (Grade II, 1968)
Place
St Mary Magdalene, Richmond, in the Anglican Diocese of Southwark, is a Grade II listed parish church on Paradise Road, Richmond, London. The church was built in the early XVI century but has been greatly altered so that apart from the tower, the visible parts of the church date from the XVIII, XIX and early XX centuries. The initial chapel was built in around 1220. The church was entirely rebuilt during the reign of Henry VII, who rebuilt the royal palace of Sheen and, in 1501, renamed Sheen as Richmond. The two bottom sections of the tower that survive from this period were re-faced in flint in 1904.
Notable queer residents at Paradise Road:
• Charles de Sousy Ricketts (1866–1931) and Charles Haslewood Shannon (1863–1937) lived at Chalon House, 8 Spring Terrace, Paradise Road, from 1898 to 1904, near their friends Katharine Harris Bradley and Edith Emma Cooper, aka Michael Field. After Ricketts died, Charles Shannon moved from Regent’s Park to 21 Kew Gardens Road. Shannon died here on March 18, 1937, and his ashes were buried at St Botolph (Town Road, Quarrington, Sleaford, Lincolnshire, NG34 8RS).
• Leonard Woolf (1880–1969) and Virginia Woolf (1882–1941) lived at Hogarth House, 34 Paradise Rd, from 1915 to 1924.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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The smock mill is a timber-framed construction with weatherboarded, steeply sloping external walls. It was built on a brick base. A pivoting wooden top with sails moved independently of the main structure so that the sails could be positioned towards the wind. This was controlled by a tail fan.
Address: The Round House, Pipe Passage, Lewes, East Sussex BN7 1YQ, UK (50.87282, 0.0066)
Type: Private Property
English Heritage Building ID: 293330 (Grade II, 1985)
Place
The Round House is the brick and flint base of a windmill built by public subscription in 1802. After the working parts of the mill were moved to another site, it was converted into a private house, extended in the 1870s and 1920s. There are links with the Bloomsbury Group writer Virginia Woolf and with John Every, owner of the Phoenix Ironworks in Lewes. Ground floor open with display of historical material. In 1919, Virginia Woolf purchased the Round House in Pipe Passage, Lewes for £300. In 2009 was for sale again, but the price was £800,000.
Life
Who: Adeline Virginia Woolf, née Stephen (January 25, 1882 – March 28, 1941) and Leonard Sidney Woolf (November 25, 1880 – August 14, 1969)
The Round House, which is said to look much as it did when Woolf bought it, has been sold in 2009 by the same estate agents that originally sold it to her as a weekend and holiday home. Charles Wycherley, who runs the family estate agengy in Lewes, auctioned the house June 9, 2009. Woolf bought the house from his great-grandfather, Alfred. The owner of the cottage, which was built in 1802 and was once the town windmill, was retired teacher Annie Crowther, who moved to a home nearby. The same year Woolf purchased the Round House, she discovered Monk’s House in nearby Rodmell, which both she and Leonard favored because of its orchard and garden. She then bought Monk’s House and sold the Round House. The Round House was also owned by John Every, ironmaster of Lewes Phoenix works.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Monk’s House is an XVIII century weatherboarded cottage in the village of Rodmell, three miles south-east of Lewes, East Sussex.
Address: Rodmell, Lewes, East Sussex BN7 3HF, UK (50.83881, 0.01652)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Phone: +44 1273 474760
English Heritage Building ID: 416677 (Grade II, 1979) (managed by the National Trust)
Place
The writer Virginia Woolf and her husband, the political activist, journalist and editor Leonard Woolf, bought the house in 1919, and received there many important visitors connected to the Bloomsbury Group, including T. S. Eliot, E. M. Forster, Roger Fry and Lytton Strachey. Virginia’s sister, the artist Vanessa Bell, lived at nearby Charleston Farmhouse in Firle from 1916, and though contrasting in style, both houses became important outposts of the Bloomsbury Group. The National Trust now operates the building as a writer’s house museum. During the Woolfs’ early years at Rodmell, Monk’s House was of modest dimensions with three-quarters of an acre of garden including an orchard and a number of outbuildings. Conditions were primitive and over the years the Woolfs made many alterations and additions, including: improvements to the kitchen; the installation of a hot water range and bathroom with water closet; and a two-storey extension in 1929. In 1928 they bought an adjoining field to preserve the beautiful views from the garden towards Mount Caburn. The Woolfs spent more and more time in Rodmell, eventually living there full-time from 1940 when their flat in Mecklenburgh Square, Bloomsbury, London, was damaged during an air raid. The solitude of village life allowed Virginia respite from the tumult of London, and it was in the small wooden lodge at the bottom of the garden that many of her novels took shape. “Jacob’s Room,” published in 1922, “Mrs Dalloway” (1925), “To The Lighthouse” (1927), “Orlando” (1928), “The Waves” (1931), “The Years” (1937) and “Between The Acts” (1941), as well as other works, were also written there. Her final novel, “Between the Acts,” published posthumously in July 1941, is steeped in references to Rodmell and the traditions and values of its villagers. Virginia documented her life at the house in photographs. Preserved in the Monk’s House Albums, these include portraits and group pictures of many who visited the house. In Mar. 1941, Virginia committed suicide by drowning herself in the nearby River Ouse. Leonard continued to live at Monk’s House until his death in 1969, and played an active role in village life. Both he and Virginia had been members of the Socialist Party, and he became a manager of the village school in Rodmell in the 1930s. He was also treasurer and president of the Rodmell and District Horticultural Society. Upon Leonard’s death the house was bequeathed to his close friend, the artist Trekkie Parsons, née Ritchie, who sold it to the University of Sussex in 1972. It was eventually turned over to the National Trust in 1980, and is open to the public. The ground floor, including sitting room, dining room, kitchen and Virginia’s bedroom, is on display and Virginia’s writing lodge can be found at the bottom of the garden with views across to Mount Caburn.
Life
Who: Adeline Virginia Woolf, née Stephen (January 25, 1882 – March 28, 1941) and Leonard Sidney Woolf (November 25, 1880 – August 14, 1969)
Virginia Woolf was a writer and one of the foremost modernists of the XX century. After the death of their father and Virginia’s second nervous breakdown, Vanessa and Adrian bought a house at 46 Gordon Square in Bloomsbury. Woolf came to know Lytton Strachey, Clive Bell, Rupert Brooke, Saxon Sydney-Turner, Duncan Grant, Leonard Woolf, John Maynard Keynes, David Garnett, and Roger Fry, who together formed the nucleus of the intellectual circle of writers and artists known as the Bloomsbury Group. Several members of the group attained notoriety in 1910 with the Dreadnought hoax, which Virginia participated in disguised as a male Abyssinian royal. Her complete 1940 talk on the hoax was discovered and is published in the memoirs collected in the expanded edition of “The Platform of Time” (2008.) In 1907 Vanessa married Clive Bell, and the couple’s interest in avant garde art would have an important influence on Woolf’s development as an author. Virginia Stephen married the writer Leonard Woolf on August 10, 1912. Despite his low material status (Woolf referring to Leonard during their engagement as a "penniless Jew") the couple shared a close bond. Indeed, in 1937, Woolf wrote in her diary: "Love-making—after 25 years can’t bear to be separate ... you see it is enormous pleasure being wanted: a wife. And our marriage so complete." The two also collaborated professionally, in 1917 founding the Hogarth Press, which subsequently published Virginia’s novels along with works by T. S. Eliot, Laurens van der Post, and others. The Press also commissioned works by contemporary artists, including Dora Carrington and Vanessa Bell. The ethos of the Bloomsbury group encouraged a liberal approach to sexuality, and in 1922 she met the writer and gardener Vita Sackville-West, wife of Harold Nicolson. After a tentative start, they began a sexual relationship, which, according to Sackville-West in a letter to her husband dated August 17, 1926, was only twice consummated. However, Virginia’s intimacy with Vita seems to have continued into the early 1930s. In 1928, Woolf presented Sackville-West with “Orlando,” a fantastical biography in which the eponymous hero’s life spans three centuries and both sexes. Nigel Nicolson, Vita Sackville-West’s son, wrote, "The effect of Vita on Virginia is all contained in “Orlando,” the longest and most charming love letter in literature, in which she explores Vita, weaves her in and out of the centuries, tosses her from one sex to the other, plays with her, dresses her in furs, lace and emeralds, teases her, flirts with her, drops a veil of mist around her." After their affair ended, the two women remained friends until Woolf’s death in 1941. After completing the manuscript of her last (posthumously published) novel, “Between the Acts,” Woolf fell into a depression similar to that which she had earlier experienced. The onset of WWII, the destruction of her London home during the Blitz, and the cool reception given to her biography of her late friend Roger Fry all worsened her condition until she was unable to work. On March 28, 1941, Woolf drowned herself by filling her overcoat pockets with stones and walking into the River Ouse near her home. Woolf’s body was not found until Apr. 18, 1941. Her husband buried her cremated remains under an elm in the garden of Monk’s House, their home in Rodmell, Sussex.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Close to the end of the war, H.D. met the wealthy novelist Bryher (Annie Winifred Ellerman.) They lived together until 1946, and although both took numerous other partners, Bryher remained her lover for the rest of H.D.’s life.
Address: Mecklenburgh Square, London WC1N 2AB, UK
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
Place
Mecklenburgh Square is located in the King’s Cross area of central London. The Square and its garden were part of the Foundling Estate, a residential development of 1792–1825 on fields surrounding and owned by the Foundling Hospital. The Square was named in honour of King George III’s Queen, Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz. It was begun in 1804, but was not completed until 1825. It is notable for the number of historic terraced houses that face directly onto the square and the Mecklenburgh Square Garden. Access to the garden is only permitted to resident keyholders, except on two days a year when it is open to all visitors for Open Garden Squares Weekend. The garden was laid out and planted between 1809 and 1810 as the centrepiece of the newly developed Mecklenburgh Square. The 2 acres (8,100 m2) garden is made up of formal lawns, gravel paths, mature plane trees and other ornamental trees. It contains a children’s playground,and a tennis court. The east side of the garden is planted with plants native to New Zealand. To the west is Coram’s Fields, a playground for children, and to the east is Gray’s Inn Road, a major thoroughfare for the area. Goodenough College is a postgraduate residence and educational trust on the north and south sides of the square, and operates an academic-oriented hotel on the east side. Russell Square tube station is located to the south-west of the square, and the major railway terminus of King’s Cross-St Pancras is a short walk north.
Notable queer residents at Mecklenburgh Square:
• No. 44, WC1N H.D. (Hilda Doolittle September 10, 1886– September 27, 1961), American poet, lived here from 1917 to 1918.
• No. 37, WC1N Virginia Woolf (1882-1941) from 1939 to 1940. The house was bombed in a German air raid in 1940 and replaced in 1957 by William Goodenough House at Goodenough College.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

The Hotel Café Royal is a five-star hotel at 68 Regent Street, W1B. Before its conversion in 2008-2012 it was a restaurant and meeting place. By the 1890s the Café Royal had become the place to see and be seen at. Its patrons have included Oscar Wilde, Aleister Crowley, Virginia Woolf, D.H. Lawrence, Winston Churchill, Noël Coward, Brigitte Bardot, Max Beerbohm, George Bernard Shaw, Jacob Epstein, Mick Jagger, Elizabeth Taylor, Muhammad Ali and Diana, Princess of Wales. The café was the scene of a famous meeting on March 24, 1895, when Frank Harris advised Oscar Wilde to drop his charge of criminal libel against the Marquess of Queensberry, father of Alfred Douglas. Queensberry was acquitted, and Wilde was subsequently tried, convicted and imprisoned.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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Tags: days of love, queer places
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