elisa_rolle (elisa_rolle) wrote,
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Bryher (September 2, 1894 – January 28, 1983)

Bryher was the pen name of the English novelist, poet, memoirist, and magazine editor Annie Winifred Ellerman, of the Ellerman ship-owning family.
Born: September 2, 1894, Margate, United Kingdom
Died: January 28, 1983, Vevey, Switzerland
Lived: 1 South Audley Street, W1K
Norfolk House, Harold Road (at the NW corner of Albion and Harold), Margate
44 Mecklenburgh Square, London WC1N 2AB, UK
2 Herbert Mansions, 35-36 Sloane Street, SW1X
49 Lowndes Square, SW1X
Villa Kenwin, 1814 La Tour-de-Peilz, Switzerland (46.45721, 6.86926)
Riant Chateau, Territet, 1820 Montreux, Switzerland (46.42689, 6.92313)
Buried: Vevey (Saint Martin's) Cemetery, Vevey, District de la Riviera-Pays-d’Enhaut, Vaud, Switzerland
Parents: Sir John Ellerman, 1st Baronet
Movies: Borderline
Spouse: Kenneth Macpherson (m. 1927–1947), Robert McAlmon (m. 1921–1927)

Hilda Doolittle was an American poet, novelist and memoirist known for her association with the early 20th century avant-garde Imagist group of poets such as Ezra Pound and Richard Aldington. Close to the end of the war, H.D. met the wealthy English novelist Bryher (Annie Winifred Ellerman). They lived together until 1946, and although both took numerous other partners, Bryher remained her lover for the rest of H.D.'s life. From 1920, her relationship with Bryher became closer and the pair travelled in Egypt, Greece and the United States before eventually settling in Switzerland. Bryher entered a marriage of convenience in 1921 with Robert McAlmon. They divorced in 1927. Bryher married H.D.'s new male lover, bisexual Kenneth Macpherson. Critic Barbara Guest termed it as a “menagerie of three.” H.D. was unapologetic about her sexuality, and thus became an icon for both the gay rights and feminist movements when her poems, plays, letters and essays were rediscovered during the 1970s and 1980s.
Together from 1918 to 1961: 43 years.
Annie Winifred Ellerman aka Bryher (September 2, 1894 – January 28, 1983)
Hilda Doolittle aka H.D. (September 10, 1886 – September 27, 1961)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Bryher was the pen name of the novelist, poet, memoirist, and magazine editor Annie Winifred Ellerman. In 1921, she entered into a marriage of convenience with the American author Robert McAlmon, whom she divorced in 1927. The same year she married Kenneth Macpherson, a writer who shared her interest in film and who was at the same time H.D. 's lover (H.D. was Bryher’s lover as well). In Burier, Switzerland, overlooking Lake Geneva, the couple built a Bauhaus-style style structure that doubled as a home and film studio, which they named Kenwin (Kenneth + Winifred). They formally adopted H.D.'s young daughter, Perdita. In 1928, H.D. became pregnant with Macpherson's child, but chose to abort the pregnancy. Bryher divorced MacPherson in 1947, even if she continued to provide for him. Bryher and H.D. no longer lived together after 1946, but continued their relationship until H.D.’s death in 1961. Bryher, H.D., and Macpherson formed the film magazine Close Up, and the POOL Group. Only one POOL film, Borderline (1930), starring H.D. and Paul Roberson, survives in its entirety.
Together from 1927 to 1947: 20 years.
Bryher (September 2, 1894 – January 28, 1983)
Kenneth Macpherson (March 27, 1902 - June 14, 1971)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Bryher was born Annie Winifred Glover on September 2, 1894, at Norfolk House, Harold Road (at the NW corner of Albion and Harold), Margate, to Hannah Glover and John Ellerman (unmarried). 



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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Close to the end of the war, H.D. met the wealthy novelist Bryher (Annie Winifred Ellerman.) They lived together until 1946, and although both took numerous other partners, Bryher remained her lover for the rest of H.D.’s life.
Address: Mecklenburgh Square, London WC1N 2AB, UK
Type: Historic Street (open to public)
Place
Mecklenburgh Square is located in the King’s Cross area of central London. The Square and its garden were part of the Foundling Estate, a residential development of 1792–1825 on fields surrounding and owned by the Foundling Hospital. The Square was named in honour of King George III’s Queen, Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz. It was begun in 1804, but was not completed until 1825. It is notable for the number of historic terraced houses that face directly onto the square and the Mecklenburgh Square Garden. Access to the garden is only permitted to resident keyholders, except on two days a year when it is open to all visitors for Open Garden Squares Weekend. The garden was laid out and planted between 1809 and 1810 as the centrepiece of the newly developed Mecklenburgh Square. The 2 acres (8,100 m2) garden is made up of formal lawns, gravel paths, mature plane trees and other ornamental trees. It contains a children’s playground,and a tennis court. The east side of the garden is planted with plants native to New Zealand. To the west is Coram’s Fields, a playground for children, and to the east is Gray’s Inn Road, a major thoroughfare for the area. Goodenough College is a postgraduate residence and educational trust on the north and south sides of the square, and operates an academic-oriented hotel on the east side. Russell Square tube station is located to the south-west of the square, and the major railway terminus of King’s Cross-St Pancras is a short walk north.
Notable queer residents at Mecklenburgh Square:
• No. 44, WC1N H.D. (Hilda Doolittle September 10, 1886– September 27, 1961), American poet, lived here from 1917 to 1918.
• No. 37, WC1N Virginia Woolf (1882-1941) from 1939 to 1940. The house was bombed in a German air raid in 1940 and replaced in 1957 by William Goodenough House at Goodenough College.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

In 1919 Bryher moved out of 1 South Audley Street, W1K where she had lived since 1909. The home was a “great Victorian mansion at 1 South Audley Street, her house overflowed with mosaics, tapestries, carvings, furniture, and a medley of objects, some of them works of art and others without value.” Around this time Bryher began traveling to Greece with H.D. and Havelock Ellis. She also assumed responsibility for care of Perdita Aldington, H.D.’s daughter.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

English born writer and philanthropist, her father shipowner and financier John Ellerman was reputed to be the richest Englishman upon his death in 1933, Annie Winifred Ellerman used the pseudonym Bryher, after her favourite island in Scilly. She spent much of the 1920's at 2 Herbert Mansions, 35-36 Sloane Street, SW1X and in France. She spent the war years, from 1934 to 1946, in a cramped flat at 49 Lowndes Square, SW1X with H.D.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Since 1921, H.D. had been a close friend of Bryher. They had a lesbian relationship, spending a lot of time together in Riant Chateau, Territet, Switzerland, where Bryher had a house. Not long after their marriage, Macpherson and Bryher moved to Territet, later joined by Doolittle.
Address: Territet, 1820 Montreux, Switzerland (46.42689, 6.92313)
Type: Private Property
Place
Built in 1913, Design by Michel Polak (1885-1948)
The Riant Chateau was built for Belgian businessman Lucien Kaisin. This complex was built for a cosmopolitan clientele and was considered very advanced for its time. It had the most modern elevators and central heating of its time, and was furnished with luxurious fittings. In its heyday, it was the meeting place for avant-garde of the cinema; it was frequently visited by such notables as Eisenstein, Room and Pabst and housed the headquarters of the publishers of the magazine Pool. The redevelopment program has ensured that the spirit of the building has been retained, while all essential services have been replaced and modern technology added. The interior of the building reflects the extravagance and luxury of the Belle Époque, with high ceilings, elaborate cornices, inlaid mirrors, stained glass, heavy oak doors, and antique oak parquet floors. Bordering the Riant Chateau is Rose Park, a beautiful park which extends to the Anglican church. At present an underground parking space is being built beneath Rose Park which is being re-landscaped and replanted with more trees for added privacy. On the other side of the garden lies the Anglican church, and beyond that the terminus of the Mont Pelerin funicular. Rose Park was a favorite haunt of the Austrian Empress Sissi, whose statue serves as a reminder to today’s visitors.
Life
Who: Kenneth Macpherson (March 27, 1902 - June 14, 1971), Bryher (September 2, 1894 – January 28, 1983) and Hilda "H.D." Doolittle (September 10, 1886 – September 27, 1961)
It was in 1927, from their base in Territet, that Kenneth Macpherson, Bryher and HD launched themselves as the Pool Group. Pool would veer away from the West’s commercial model of film production, and produce material which would promote cinematography as an “art form.” Their model would be based on the work coming out of Germany, particularly G W Pabst, and coming out of Russia, particularly Sergei Eisenstein. Their subject matter would be human behaviour, and its many facets, and their task would be representing this behaviour on screen, influenced by the work of Freud. Also at Territet, Macpherson founded the influential film journal, Close Up, dedicated to "independent cinema and cinema from around the world.” The first issue of Close Up, describing itself on the front cover as an "international magazine devoted to film art,” appeared in July 1927. Macpherson was editor, with Bryher as assistant editor, and Doolittle making regular contributions. Macpherson, who was particularly influenced by the Russian film-maker Sergei Eisenstein and whom he first met in 1929, "dictated the tone and direction of the publication, contributing articles that defined the role of the director and defended the integrity of cinema and its right to be considered as art.” Close Up published many of the first translations of Eisenstein’s ideas. Macpherson continued as the main editor until the magazine’s demise in 1933. Bryher is buried at Cimetière Saint-Martin (Boulevard Saint-Martin, 1800 Vevey).



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
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Villa Kenwin, La Tour-de-Peilz (2)
In September, 1931, Kenneth Macpherson and Bryher moved to a new home at Burier-La-Tour, which they had commissioned Hans Henselmann to build on plans drawn up several years earlier by Alexander Ferenczy.
Address: 1814 La Tour-de-Peilz, Switzerland (46.45721, 6.86926)
Type: Private Property
Place
The home, which overlooked Lake Geneva, came to be known as Kenwin, derived from the names of its commissioners, Kenneth and Winifred, and would double as a film studio and home, not only for themselves, but also for an assortment of dogs, cats, and monkeys. Bryher gave her address, at the time, as Villa Kenwin, Chemin de Vallon, 1814 Burier-La-Tour, Vaud, Switzerland. During the war years, Bryher would use Kenwin as a staging post for the evacuation of refugees from Nazi Germany. Abandoned after the death of Bryher who will live there until 1983, it was bought in 1987 by the architect Giovanni Pezzoli who undertook a complete renovation. It is registered as a Swiss cultural object of national importance. In 1996, a documentary film entitled "Kenwin" and telling the story of the villa Kenwin was directed by Véronique Goël on the basis of archive footage.
Life
Who: Kenneth Macpherson (March 27, 1902 - June 14, 1971) and Bryher (September 2, 1894 – January 28, 1983)
Bryher was the pen name of the English novelist, poet, memoirist, and magazine editor Annie Winifred Ellerman. Her father was the shipowner and financier John Ellerman, who at the time of his death in 1933, was the richest Englishman who had ever lived. He lived with her mother Hannah Glover, but did not marry her until 1908. During the 1920s, Bryher was an unconventional figure in Paris. Among her circle of friends were Ernest Hemingway, James Joyce, Gertrude Stein, Sylvia Beach and Berenice Abbott. Her wealth enabled her to give financial support to struggling writers, including Joyce and Edith Sitwell. She also helped with finance for Sylvia Beach’s bookshop Shakespeare and Company and certain publishing ventures, and started a film company Pool Group. She also helped provide funds to purchase a flat in Paris for the destitute Dada artist and writer Baroness Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven. In 1918 she met and became involved in a lesbian relationship with poet Hilda Doolittle “H.D.” The relationship was an open one, with both taking other partners. In 1921 she entered into a marriage of convenience with the American author Robert McAlmon, whom she divorced in 1927. That same year she married Kenneth Macpherson, a writer who shared her interest in film and who was at the same time H.D.’s lover. In Burier, Switzerland, overlooking Lake Geneva, the couple built a Bauhaus-style style structure that doubled as a home and film studio, which they named Kenwin. They formally adopted H.D.’s young daughter, Perdita. In 1928, H.D. became pregnant with Macpherson’s child, but chose to abort the pregnancy. Bryher divorced MacPherson in 1947, she and Doolittle no longer lived together after 1946, but continued their relationship until Doolittle’s death in 1961.



Queer Places, Vol. 3 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906695
ISBN-10: 1532906692
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228901
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906692/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZXI10E/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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Tags: days of love, queer places
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