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Tallulah Bankhead (January 31, 1902 – December 12, 1968)

Tallulah Brockman Bankhead was an American actress of the stage and screen, and a reputed libertine. Bankhead was known for her husky voice, outrageous personality, and devastating wit.
Born: January 31, 1902, Huntsville, Alabama, United States
Died: December 12, 1968, Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States
Education: Mary Baldwin University
Lived: 1 Farm Street, W1J
The Ritz, London, 150 Piccadilly, W1J
230 E. 62nd St.
Algonquin Hotel, 59 W 44th St, New York, NY 10036
Buried: Saint Pauls Kent Churchyard, Chestertown, Kent County, Maryland, USA, Plot: Section A, Lot 94
Full name: Tallulah Brockman Bankhead
Buried: Saint Paul's Churchyard, Chestertown

Tallulah Bankhead was an American actress of the stage and screen, talk-show host, and bonne vivante. Bankhead was the daughter of US Congressman and Speaker of the House William Brockman Bankhead. According to her, “Daddy warned me about men and alcohol. But he never said a thing about women and cocaine.” She had numerous heterosexual affairs but considered herself “ambisextrous.” Rumors about Bankhead's sex life have lingered for years, and she was linked romantically with many notable female personalities of the day, including Greta Garbo, Marlene Dietrich, Eva Le Gallienne, Hattie McDaniel, and Alla Nazimova, as well as writer Mercedes de Acosta and singer Billie Holiday. Actress Patsy Kelly claimed she had a sexual relationship with Bankhead when she worked for her as a personal assistant. John Gruen's Menotti: A Biography notes an incident in which Jane Bowles chased Bankhead around Capricorn, Gian Carlo Menotti and Samuel Barber’s Mount Kisco estate, insisting that Bankhead needed to play the lesbian character Inès in Jean-Paul Sartre's No Exit (which Paul Bowles had recently translated), but Bankhead locked herself in the bathroom and kept insisting "That lesbian! I wouldn't know a thing about it."
Patsy Kelly (January 12, 1910 – September 24, 1981)
Tallulah Brockman Bankhead (January 31, 1902 – December 12, 1968)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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In 1919, the Algonquin Hotel (59 W 44th St, New York, NY 10036) hosted the Algonquin Round Table, a lunch-time gathering of wits. Members included drama critic Alexander Woollcott and writer Dorothy Parker, Talullah Bankhead, Estelle Winwood, Eva LaGallienne, and Blythe Daly. Overnight guests included Noel Coward, Tennessee Williams, Gore Vidal, Gertrude Stein, and Alice B. Toklas.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
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Tallulah Bankhead inhabited a flat at 1 Farm Street, W1J for much of her stay in London, where infamous parties were held, of which the uninhibited hostess was always the life and soul of. Once she opened the door pad naked and lead guests to the bathroom for cocktails.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
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The Ritz, London (150 Piccadilly, W1J) is a Grade II listed 5-star hotel located in Piccadilly. A symbol of high society and luxury, the hotel is one of the world's most prestigious and best known hotels. It is a member of the international consortium, The Leading Hotels of the World. The hotel was opened by Swiss hotelier César Ritz in May 1906, eight years after he established the Hôtel Ritz Paris. After a weak beginning, the hotel began to gain popularity towards the end of WWI, and became popular with politicians, socialites, writers and actors of the day. Noël Coward was a notable diner at the Ritz in the 1920s and 1930s. Another notable queer resident was Tallulah Bankhead in 1957.



Queer Places, Vol. 2 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532906312
ISBN-10: 1532906315
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228833
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532906315/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1KZBO/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

The Treadwell Farm Historic District is a small historic district located on parts of East 61st and East 62nd Street between Second and Third Avenues, in the Upper East Side neighborhood of the borough of Manhattan in New York City.
Address: E 61st and E 62nd St, New York, NY 10065, USA
Type: Private Property
National Register of Historic Places: Treadwell Farm Historic District (E. 61st and 62nd Sts. bet. Second and Third Aves.), 04000541, 2004
Place
Designated by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission on Dec. 13, 1967, making it one of the first historic districts in the city, it is primarily made up of three- and four-story brownstone residences constructed in the middle- to late- XIX century. It also includes the Church of Our Lady of Peace, Trinity Baptist Church, and several turn-of-the-century apartment buildings, and is notable for the general uniformity of the heights of the houses and the style of the architecture, as well as the overall character and charm of the neighborhood. Treadwell Farm was named for the Treadwell family, who owned the land at the time it was developed. In the Colonial period, the property was part of the Peter Pra Van Zandt farm, although the historic district also includes a small triangular piece of the William Beekman farm. In 1815, Adam Tredwell, a fur merchant, and Stephen Thorne Jr. bought the Van Zandt farm, paying $13,000 for 24 acres. When Thorne died in 1830, Tredwell bought his half of the property. After Tredwell’s death in 1852, his daughter Elizabeth bought the Beekman tract, and the combined property was divided into lots; these were sold for development beginning in 1854. By 1868, restrictive covenants attached to the sale specified standards for heights, widths and construction of buildings on the lots, and also restricted the types of businesses which could be located there. The major development of the Tredwell Farm property took place from 1868–76, and was primarily in the form of Italianate row houses, with echoes of the French Second Empire style. The Presbyterian Church of the Redeemer, now the Roman Catholic Church of Our Lady of Peace, was built in 1886-87, and six-story apartment buildings at 245 and 247 East 62nd Street were built in 1899-1900. Noted architects who designed buildings in the district include Richard Morris Hunt, Samuel A. Warner, James W. Pirrson and George F. Pelham. In the 1920s, between 1919 and 1922, most of the buildings in the district were significantly altered. Many stoops were removed and architectural detail reduced to a more simplified form. In addition, in 1930 a church in the Scandinavian Modern style, designed by Martin G. Hedmark, was built at 250 East 61st Street. By late in the XIX century, the Treadwell Farm area had deteriorated some, but affluent New Yorkers rediscovered it in the decades after WWI.
Notable queer residents at Treadwell Farm Historic District:
• No. 217 E. 61st St.: Montgomery Clift (1920-1966), lived here from 1960 until his death in 1966.
• No. 219 E. 61st St: Ava Alice Muriel Astor (1902-1956), died of a stroke in her East Sixty-First Street apartment on July 19, 1956, aged 54.
• No. 230 E. 62nd St.: Tallulah Bankhead (1902-1968), moved into this townhouse in the late 50s. She died in New York in 1968.
• No. 211 E. 62nd St.: when Eleanor Roosevelt (1884-1962) was seven, her mother moved the family to 54 East 61st Street while her father stayed in a Paris hospital to battle his addiction to alcohol. In 1950, she rented suites at The Park Sheraton Hotel (202 West 56th Street.) She lived here until 1953 when she moved to 211 East 62nd Street. When that lease expired in 1958, she returned to The Park Sheraton as she waited for the house she purchased with Edna and David Gurewitsch at 55 East 74th Street to be renovated.
• No. 1 E. 62nd St: In the fall of 1959, Ernest Hemingway (1899-1961) rented a one-bed, one-bath, 900-square-foot apartment here. He was looking for a place where he could have privacy when he came to New York City. He had always stayed in hotels in the past. During the summer of 1960 he set up a small office here an attempted to work. He was in poor mental and physical health and could do little writing. Hemingway left New York for good soon after, and commited suicide in July 1961 at his home in Ketchum, Idaho.
• No. 52 E. 62nd St, 10065: The Browning School is a US college preparatory school for boys founded in 1888 by John A. Browning. Arthur Jones succeeded Browning as Headmaster in 1920 and moved the school from West 55th Street to its present location on East 62nd Street. It offers study from Pre-Primary level (Kindergarten) through Form VI (12th Grade). Thomas Quinn Curtiss (1915-2000), son of Roy A. Curtiss and Ethel Quinn, graduated from the Browning School in New York in 1933. He went on to study film and theatre in Vienna and Moscow, where he was a student of the film director Sergei Eisenstein. In summer 1937, he met writer Klaus Mann in Budapest and followed him through Europe. Their romantic relationship lasted for several years, but eventually Tomski (as Curtiss is called in Mann's diaries) left him because of Mann's on-going heroin addiction. Mann's suicidal novel “Vergittertes Fenster” is dedicated to him.


By Elisa Rolle

Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

At St Paul's Kent (7579 Sandy Bottom Rd, Chestertown, MD 21620) is buried Tallulah Bankhead (January 31, 1902 – December 12, 1968), American actress of the stage and screen, and a reputed libertine. Rumors about Bankhead's sex life have lingered for years, and she was linked romantically with many notable female personalities of the day, including Greta Garbo, Marlene Dietrich, Katherine Cornell, Eva Le Gallienne, Hope Williams ("who had a boy's body"), Beatrice Lillie, and Alla Nazimova, as well as writer Mercedes de Acosta and singer Billie Holiday. Actress Patsy Kelly confirmed she had a sexual relationship with Bankhead when she worked for her as a personal assistant. John Gruen's “Menotti: A Biography” notes an incident in which Jane Bowles chased Bankhead around Capricorn, Gian Carlo Menotti and Samuel Barber's Mount Kisco estate, insisting that Bankhead needed to play the lesbian character Inès in Jean-Paul Sartre's “No Exit.” Bankhead locked herself in the bathroom and kept insisting, "That lesbian! I wouldn't know a thing about it." Bankhead never publicly described herself as being bisexual. She did, however, describe herself as "ambisextrous". 



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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