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Frances Willard (September 28, 1839 – February 17, 1898)

Frances Elizabeth Caroline Willard was an American educator, temperance reformer, and women's suffragist. Her influence was instrumental in the passage of the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Amendments to the United States Constitution.
Born: September 28, 1839, Churchville, New York, United States
Died: February 17, 1898, New York City, New York, United States
Lived: Frances Willard House, 1730 Chicago Ave, Evanston, IL 60201, USA (42.04891, -87.67872)
Frances Willard Schoolhouse, Rock County 4-H Fair Inc, 1301 Craig Ave, Janesville, WI 53545, USA (42.69161, -89.00531)
Buried: Rosehill Cemetery and Mausoleum, Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, USA, Plot: Section F
Find A Grave Memorial# 6555
Organizations founded: Woman's Christian Temperance Union, Prohibition Party

Frances Willard was an American educator, temperance reformer, and women's suffragist. Anna Adams Gordon was an American social reformer and songwriter. In 1877, Gordon met Willard at a Dwight L. Moody revival meeting, in the building where Willard was holding temperance meetings. The two became close friends, with Gordon continuing to play organ for Willard's meetings. Gordon eventually moved into Willard's residence as her personal secretary. Modern scholars have speculated on the precise nature of the relationship between Gordon and Willard (who preferred to be called "Frank"), believing both to have been lesbians. They remained intimate friends until Willard's death in 1898, at which time Lillian M. N. Stevens became president of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union, with Gordon as vice-president. That same year, Gordon also wrote a memorial biography of Willard. Upon Lillian Stevens' death in 1914, Anna Adams Gordon became president of the WCTU. “The loves of women for each other grow more numerous each day, and I have pondered much why these things were. That so little should be said about them surprises me, for they are everywhere…. In these days, when any capable and careful women can honorably earn her own support, there is no village that has not its examples of “two hearts in counsel,” both of which are feminine.” –Frances E. Willard, Glimpses of Fifty Years (1889)
Together from 1877 to 1898: 21 years.
Anna Adams Gordon (July 21, 1853 – June 15, 1931)
Frances Elizabeth Caroline Willard (September 28, 1839 – February 17, 1898)



Days of Love edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
ISBN-10: 1500563323
Release Date: September 21, 2014
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The Frances Willard Schoolhouse is located in Janesville, Wisconsin.
Address: Rock County 4-H Fair Inc, 1301 Craig Ave, Janesville, WI 53545, USA (42.69161, -89.00531)
Type: Education facility (open to public)
National Register of Historic Places: 77000054, 1977
Place
The schoolhouse was built by Josiah Willard and his neighbor, David Inman. It was named after Willard’s daughter, Frances, the noted suffragist.
Life
Who: Frances Elizabeth Caroline Willard (September 28, 1839 – February 17, 1898)
In 1869, Frances Willard (1839-1898) was involved in the founding of Evanston Ladies’ College. In 1870, the college united with the former North Western Female College to become the Evanston College for Ladies, of which Willard became president. After only one year, the Evanston College for Ladies merged with Northwestern University and Willard became Northwestern’s first Dean of Women of the Women’s College. However, that position was to be short-lived due to her resignation in 1874. After her resignation, Willard focused her energies on a new career, traveling the American East Coast participating in the women’s temperance movement. Her tireless efforts for women’s suffrage and prohibition included a fifty-day speaking tour in 1874, an average of 30,000 miles of travel a year, and an average of four hundred lectures a year for a ten-year period, mostly with her longtime companion Anna Adams Gordon (1853-1931). In 1877, Gordon met Frances E. Willard at a Dwight L. Moody revival meeting, in the building where Willard was holding temperance meetings. Gordon’s younger brother Arthur had died just days before, a traumatic event which had, as Willard later wrote, driven Gordon "Godward.” The two became close friends, with Gordon continuing to play organ for Willard’s meetings. Gordon eventually moved into Willard’s residence as her personal secretary.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
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Frances Willard House was the home of Frances Willard and her family and was the longtime headquarters of the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union (WCTU.) Willard called the house Rest Cottage because it became a place for her to rest in between her tours and WCTU activities.
Address: 1730 Chicago Ave, Evanston, IL 60201, USA (42.04891, -87.67872)
Type: Museum (open to public)
Phone: +1 847-328-7500
National Register of Historic Places: 66000318, 1966. Also National Historic Landmarks.
Place
The original 1865 house was probably based on a pattern book. It was an L-shaped building with vertical board and batten siding. The 1878 addition was consistent with the architectural form of the house but greatly expanded it. Proceeds from the sale of Willard’s autobiography were used to add large bay windows on the main facade around 1890. Willard made another addition in 1893. The two-story house is in the Carpenter Gothic style. It is painted pearl grey and has white trim. The front of the house has two columned porches. Three small porches lead to other entrances, and the second floor has a balcony on the rear. The three gables on the main facade have decorative trim and a turned finial in the center. There are seventeen rooms in the house, most with oak and walnut flooring.
Life
Who: Frances Elizabeth Caroline Willard (September 28, 1839 – February 17, 1898) and Anna Adams Gordon (July 21, 1853 – June 15, 1931)
Frances Willard was born in 1839 in Churchville, New York. When she was two, her family moved to Oberlin, Ohio, a town recently founded by ministers who wanted to build a community with strong Christian morals. When she was 18, Willard moved with her family to Evanston, Illinois to attend the Northwestern Female College. She spent the next sixteen years of her life as an educator at a variety of institutions across the county. In 1865, her father Josiah, who stayed in Evanston, built a house, which remains as the southern portion of the current structure. Frances Willard returned to Evanston and moved in with her father in 1871 when she accepted a position as Dean of the Women’s College at Northwestern. Unhappy with the role of women at the university, and frequently at odds with University President Charles Henry Fowler, Willard resigned three years later. Willard’s resignation prompted a change in her life. She resumed her position as a travelling educator, but began to focus on the study of temperance. In the summer of 1874, Willard travelled around the East Coast to meet with other temperance advocates. She also became a noted public speaker on the virtue. Returning to Evanston, she helped to found the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union (WCTU) and was elected its first corresponding secretary and first president of the Chicago chapter. Her brother Oliver died in 1878, and Frances decided to expand her Evanston home that April to accommodate his widow and four children. The next year, she was elected President of the WCTU. After her brother’s family moved to Germany, Willard began to rent out the northern section of her house to friends and fellow WCTU members. This section soon became used as an informal headquarters for the WCTU under Willard. Willard died in 1898 and left the entire house to the WCTU in her will. Two years later, the WCTU made the house in Evanston its national headquarters. The WCTU also made the house into a museum dedicated to Willard in that year. In 1910, the organization built the Literature Building in the rear of the property. Museum tours are now offered to the public on the first and third Sundays of every month. Willard is buried at Rosehill Cemetery and Mausoleum, Chicago. Her lifelong companion Anna Adams Gordon is buried at Mount Hope Cemetery, Mattapan, Massachusetts.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

At Rosehill Cemetery (5800 N Ravenswood Ave, Chicago, IL 60660) is buried Frances Willard (1839-1898), American educator, temperance reformer, and women's suffragist. In the same cemetery is buried Margaret “Marty” Mann (1904-1980), an early female member of Alcoholics Anonymous and author of the chapter "Women Suffer Too" in the second through fourth editions of the Big Book of AA.



Queer Places, Vol. 1 edited by Elisa Rolle
ISBN-13: 978-1532901904
ISBN-10: 1532901909
Release Date: July 24, 2016
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/6228297
Amazon (print): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1532901909/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IZ1BU9K/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

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Tags: days of love, queer places
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