Tags: author: rupert brooke

andrew potter

James Strachey & Rupert Brooke

Alix Strachey (4 June 1892 – 28 April 1973), née Sargant-Florence, was an American-born British psychoanalyst and with her husband the translator into English of the works of Sigmund Freud. (P: Alix Strachey (née Sargant-Florence) by Barbara Ker-Seymer bromide print on green tissue and card mount, 1930s 12 in. x 8 7/8 in. (304 mm x 227 mm) Purchased, 1979 Photographs Collection NPG x13132)

Strachey was born in Nutley, New Jersey, USA, the daughter of Henry Smyth Florence, an American musician, and Mary Sargant Florence, a British painter. Her elder brother, Philip Sargant Florence, later became a noted economist and married the pioneer birth control activist Lella Faye Secor. Alix was educated in England at Bedales School, the Slade School of Fine Art, and Newnham College, Cambridge, where she read modern languages. In 1915 she moved in with her brother in his flat in Bloomsbury and became a member of the Bloomsbury Group, where she met James Strachey, then the assistant editor of The Spectator. They moved in together in 1919 and married in 1920. Soon afterwards they moved to Vienna, where James, an admirer of Freud, began a psychoanalysis with him.

Freud asked the couple to translate some of his works into English, and this was to become their lives' work. Both became psychoanalysts themselves, and as well as Freud's works also translated works by a number of other European psychoanalysts. Their translations remain the standard editions of Freud's works to this day.


NPG Ax140441. Picnic in the woods, 1915 (Faith Marion Jane Henderson (nee Bagenal) (born 1889), Wife of Sir Hubert Douglas Henderson; Sir Hubert Douglas Henderson (1890-1952), Economist; Lady Ottoline Morrell (1873-1938), Patron of the arts; half-sister of 6th Duke of Portland; wife of Philip Edward Morrell; Henry Tertius James Norton (1886-1937), Mathematician; Bertrand Arthur William Russell, 3rd Earl Russell (1872-1970), Philosopher and social reformer; (Giles) Lytton Strachey (1880-1932), Critic and biographer; son of Sir Richard Strachey)
James Strachey was a British psychoanalyst, and, with his wife Alix, a translator of Sigmund Freud into English. At Cambridge, Strachey fell deeply in love with the poet Rupert Brooke, who did not return his affections. He was himself pursued by mountaineer George Mallory (conceding to his sexual advances), by Harry Norton, and by economist John Maynard Keynes, with whom he also had an affair. His love of Brooke was a constant, however, until the latter's death, which left Strachey “shattered”.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alix_Strachey

George Herbert Leigh Mallory (18 June 1886 – 8 or 9 June 1924) was an English mountaineer who took part in the first three British expeditions to Mount Everest in the early 1920s. Mallory's natural grace and charm --- and a developing enthusiasm for learning --- brought him into the inner circles of Cambridge and close friendships with several members of the Bloomsbury group, the clique of English intellectuals. (It included the painters Duncan Grant, Vanessa Bell and Roger Fry, essayist Lytton Strachey, economist John Maynard Keynes, and novelists Virginia Woolf and E.M. Forster.)

While an undergraduate, Mallory became romantically involved with various members of the Bloomsbury group. Lytton Strachey fell drastically in love with Mallory and Mallory fell in love with Lytton's brother, James. He also dallied with Duncan Grant, posing naked for him. 'I am profoundly interested in the nude me,' Mallory confessed in a letter to Grant. According to letters unearthed by the Gillmans, Mallory's sole homosexual experience was with James Strachey ('He insisted on copulating,' Strachey reported to Rupert Brooke) and in 1914 he met and married the luminously beautiful Ruth Turner.

During the 1924 British Mount Everest Expedition, Mallory and his climbing partner Andrew "Sandy" Irvine both disappeared somewhere high on the North-East ridge during their attempt to make the first ascent of the world's highest mountain. The pair's last known sighting was only about 800 vertical feet from the summit.


NPG Ax13024. George Leigh Mallory, ca. 1912 (©19)
While an undergraduate, George Mallory became romantically involved with various members of the Bloomsbury group. Lytton Strachey fell drastically in love with Mallory and Mallory fell in love with Lytton's brother, James. He also dallied with Duncan Grant, posing naked for him. Mallory's sole homosexual experience was with James Strachey and in 1914 he met and married the luminously beautiful Ruth Turner. Mallory died in 1924 during the third British expeditions to Mount Everest. His body was discovered on 1 May 1999 by an expedition that had set out to search for the climbers' remains.


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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Mallory

James Beaumont Strachey (/ˈstreɪtʃi/; 26 September 1887, London – 25 April 1967, High Wycombe) was a British psychoanalyst, and, with his wife Alix, a translator of Sigmund Freud into English. He is perhaps best known as the general editor of the "Standard Edition of the Complete Psychological Works of Sigmund Freud ... the international authority". (P: NPG x24010. James Beaumont Strachey, ca. 1915 (©19))

He was a son of Lt-Gen Sir Richard Strachey and Lady (Jane) Strachey, called the enfant miracle as his father was 70 and his mother 47. Some of his nieces and nephews, who were considerably older than James, called him Jembeau or Uncle Baby. His parents had thirteen children, of whom ten lived to adulthood.

He was educated at Hillbrow preparatory school in Rugby and at Trinity College, Cambridge, where he took over the rooms used by his older brother Lytton Strachey, and was known as "the Little Strachey"; Lytton was now "the Great Strachey". At Cambridge, Strachey fell deeply in love with the poet Rupert Brooke, who did not return his affections. He was himself pursued by mountaineer George Mallory—conceding to his sexual advances—by Harry Norton, and by economist John Maynard Keynes, with whom he also had an affair. His love of Brooke was a constant, however, until the latter's death in 1915, which left Strachey "shattered".

On the imposition of military conscription in 1916, during World War I, James became a conscientious objector.

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Strachey

Rupert Chawner Brooke (middle name sometimes given as Chaucer) (3 August 1887 – 23 April 1915) was an English poet known for his idealistic war sonnets written during the First World War, especially The Soldier. He was also known for his boyish good looks, which were said to have prompted the Irish poet W. B. Yeats to describe him as "the handsomest young man in England".

Brooke was born at 5 Hillmorton Road in Rugby, Warwickshire, the second of the three sons of William Parker Brooke, a Rugby schoolmaster, and Ruth Mary Brooke, née Cotterill. He was educated at two independent schools in the market town of Rugby, Warwickshire; Hillbrow School and Rugby School in England.

While travelling in Europe he prepared a thesis entitled John Webster and the Elizabethan Drama, which won him a scholarship to King's College, Cambridge, where he became a member of the Cambridge Apostles, helped found the Marlowe Society drama club and acted in plays including the Cambridge Greek Play.

Brooke made friends among the Bloomsbury group of writers, some of whom admired his talent while others were more impressed by his good looks. Virginia Woolf boasted to Vita Sackville-West of once going skinny-dipping with Brooke in a moonlit pool when they were at Cambridge together.

Brooke belonged to another literary group known as the Georgian Poets and was one of the most important of the Dymock poets, associated with the Gloucestershire village of Dymock where he spent some time before the war. He also lived in the Old Vicarage, Grantchester.



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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rupert_BrookeCollapse )

Days of Love: Celebrating LGBT History One Story at a Time by Elisa Rolle
Paperback: 760 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (July 1, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1500563323
ISBN-13: 978-1500563325
CreateSpace Store: https://www.createspace.com/4910282
Amazon (Paperback): http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500563323/?tag=elimyrevandra-20
Amazon (Kindle): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MZG0VHY/?tag=elimyrevandra-20

Days of Love chronicles more than 700 LGBT couples throughout history, spanning 2000 years from Alexander the Great to the most recent winner of a Lambda Literary Award. Many of the contemporary couples share their stories on how they met and fell in love, as well as photos from when they married or of their families. Included are professional portraits by Robert Giard and Stathis Orphanos, paintings by John Singer Sargent and Giovanni Boldini, and photographs by Frances Benjamin Johnson, Arnold Genthe, and Carl Van Vechten among others. “It's wonderful. Laying it out chronologically is inspired, offering a solid GLBT history. I kept learning things. I love the decision to include couples broken by death. It makes clear how important love is, as well as showing what people have been through. The layout and photos look terrific.” Christopher Bram “I couldn’t resist clicking through every page. I never realized the scope of the book would cover centuries! I know that it will be hugely validating to young, newly-emerging LGBT kids and be reassured that they really can have a secure, respected place in the world as their futures unfold.” Howard Cruse “This international history-and-photo book, featuring 100s of detailed bios of some of the most forward-moving gay persons in history, is sure to be one of those bestsellers that gay folk will enjoy for years to come as reference and research that is filled with facts and fun.” Jack Fritscher


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